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    #1

    Smile "the canterville ghost"

    I'm reading the novel "the canterville ghost".
    There are three sentences I can't understand.
    1)’And then on to the twins! Those horrible boys are going to learn a lesson tonight.'
    what does "on to" mean?
    2)’ It was his job to appear in the passage once a week,and to 'Oooooh!'and'Aaaagh!'from the great windows on the stairs ・・・’
    How is "to" used here?
    3)'one night his feet went from under him and he was crashing down the stairs to the bottom.'
    I don't understand the meaning of the first part of this sentence.
    Please tell me how to use them.

  1. Khosro's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "the canterville ghost"

    Quote Originally Posted by yuyu0615 View Post
    I'm reading the novel "the canterville ghost".
    There are three sentences I can't understand.
    1)’And then on to the twins! Those horrible boys are going to learn a lesson tonight.'
    what does "on to" mean?
    2)’ It was his job to appear in the passage once a week,and to 'Oooooh!'and'Aaaagh!'from the great windows on the stairs ・・・’
    How is "to" used here?
    3)'one night his feet went from under him and he was crashing down the stairs to the bottom.'
    I don't understand the meaning of the first part of this sentence.
    Please tell me how to use them.
    1) what is before "And then ..."? it would be better if you write the complete sentence. I guess that he/she was talking about something else and he/she changed the subject and started to talk about the twins.
    You know that "on" sometimes means "about":"A conference on English language". And you know that "to" sometimes refers to the direction. Here he wants to change the subject from what he was talking about "to" another subject, and he wants to say something "about" the twins. So he says:"And then on to the twins".

    2) Here "to" comes before infinitive. You can also say:
    "appearing in the passage once a week was his job".
    But the meaning is not exactly the same.
    "Oooooh!" and "Aaaah!" are what the character says, they are not infinitives but they are put in quotation mark and used as infinitives.

    3) "One night his feet went from under him". I think it just means that he sliped on the stairs. You can imagine what happens before you crash down the stairs, your feet went from under you.

    Note that this story is somewhat old and the author might have used English language in an old way.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: "the canterville ghost"

    Thank you very much.I got them.I know this is an old novel for the first time.

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