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    #1

    Smile Set VS Decide

    Hello

    1. I set another place for Christmas.
    2.I decide another place for Christmas.

    Which one is more common?
    what is the difference between set and decide?
    Let me know delicate shades of meaning.

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    #2

    Re: Set VS Decide

    1. I set another place for Christmas.
    2. I decide another place for Christmas.


    mokbon.
    I assume you mean for Christmas dinner.
    Here, to "decide" means that you make up your mind to do something, to come to a decision. In this case you have decided to have an extra person to dinner.
    Now you must "set" the place for them, which means to lay out the plate, knife and fork etc.
    So first you decide to have another place, and then you set another place.

    not a teacher

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    #3

    Smile Re: Set VS Decide

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    1. I set another place for Christmas.
    2. I decide another place for Christmas.

    So first you decide to have another place, and then you set another place.
    Then, Can I just use "set" in substitution of "decide"?


    Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's English Dictionary says

    If you set a date, price, goal, or level, you decide what it will be.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Set VS Decide

    No, they are not simply interchangeable.

    If you set a date, you decide on a date.

    Without context, if you "set a place for dinner" you put a plate and silverware there for someone to sit there to eat.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Set VS Decide

    mokbon.
    As Barb says, in this context "set a place" has the specific meaning of laying out the plate etc on the table.
    "At first I thought there were six people coming for dinner, but I've decided to set another place in case Mary comes too".
    Or you could just leave out the "decide" business altogether. If you say: ".. but I've set another place in case Mary comes too", it implies that you've made the decision.

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