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    #1

    to crack jokes/ slap-up supper

    Dear teachers,

    Would you share with me your opinion concerning the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    They have laughed and cracked jokes with John.

    There is no one like him to crack jokes.

    George said that it would be a splendid opportunity to try a good, slap-up supper.


    to crack jokes = to make a somewhat rough jokes


    slap-up = very good, excellent, first rate, bang up, magnificent, superb

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V

  1. apex2000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to crack jokes/ slap-up supper

    You're right about the food, vil, but when we say comeone is cracking jokes we are referring either to a professional comedian or someone in our group. Of course, we do tell jokes but the term, I believe, comes from reading out the feeble jokes found in Xmas crackers!!

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    #3

    Re: to crack jokes/ slap-up supper

    Hi apex2000,

    Thank you for your assistance.

    Would you be so kind to tell me your opinion about the expression “crack wise”?

    You start cracking wise, and you’ll go out of here on your ear. (E. S. Gardner, “The Case on the Shoplifter’s Shoe”)

    crack wise = be witty, crack jokes, wisecrack

    I know a witty jollier who don’t know the mentioned of you Xmas crackers in general..

    Regards,

    V.


    “Conflict is not necessarily bad, and it does not necessarily indicate a failed interaction. It is a signal, a message that says, “Things aren’t working around here. We’ve got to do something different.” Thus, conflict can be a catalyst-a motivating force-encouraging people to interact and communicate in ways that are more satisfying. Conflict can actually benefit people by pushing them to make necessary changes.” – Beverly Potter.

  2. apex2000's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to crack jokes/ slap-up supper

    This may be an old form of wiseacre - a wise guy, someone trying to be smart at another's expense.

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