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    #1

    will be marrided for 30 years in January

    "The future perfect can also be used to express states that will have endured in the future for a period time as measured at some future date"

    ***This coming January we will have been married for 30 years.***

    "In some American dialects, a pattern consisting of will+be+the past participle,which expresses the state of being, is substituted for future perfect. Thus one is often likely to hear''

    ***In January we will be married for 30 years.***


    I was just thinking whether according to the above given information the following sentence might be interpreted in two different ways?

    ***When you guys come I will be watching the soccer finals for 30 minutes.**

    If somebody said that, I would understad it in two different ways depending on the contex

    1)If it's written on the test or uttered semiformally it would mean that when they come the speaker will start watching and continue to do that for 30 minutes?

    2)If the above given sentence was preceded with another sentence like "It's too bad you can't get off work earlier." and was uttered informally, I would understand it as when they come after work to watch the game I will have been watching it for 30 minutes?


    *********SORRY FOR A TYPO IN THE HEADING**********
    Last edited by ostap77; 13-Feb-2011 at 16:19.

  1. apex2000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    ***In January we will (have been) (be) married for 30 years.***


    I was just thinking whether according to the above given information the following sentence might be interpreted in two different ways??

    ***When you guys come I will be watching the soccer finals for 30 minutes.**

    If somebody said that, I would understad it in two different ways depending on the contex

    1)If it's written on the test or uttered semiformally it would mean that when they come the speaker will start watching and continue to do that for 30 minutes??

    Only one question mark is required! Yes, that could be the meaning, but it would be more usual to mention time of arrival for clarification. Either formally or informally - there is no semiformally.

    2)If the above given sentence was preceded with another sentence like "It's too bad you can't get off work earlier." and was uttered informally, I would understand it as when they come after work to watch the game I will have been watching it for 30 minutes???
    You should still use 'I will have been', again a time indication would help.

    There are some assumptions here. If the guys know the time for kick-off they will understand that you will have watched the game for 30 minutes before their due arrival. If they do not know the time for kick-off then they would understand that you would be watching the game for 30 minutes after their arrival.

  2. Khosro's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post

    ***This coming January we will have been married for 30 years.***

    "In some American dialects, a pattern consisting of will+be+the past participle,which expresses the state of being, is substituted for future perfect. Thus one is often likely to hear''

    ***In January we will be married for 30 years.***

    I remember that I asked Raymott about the same topic few days ago. I want to know if it is really "will+be+the past participle". Is it not "will+be+adjective"? Is "married" used here because it is the past participle of "marry" or the reason is that it is a well-known adjective? Are we allowed to make sentences with "will+be+the past participle" or only when the past participle is a well-known adjective (listed in the dictionaries as adjective)?

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    #4

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    I remember that I asked Raymott about the same topic few days ago. I want to know if it is really "will+be+the past participle". Is it not "will+be+adjective"? Is "married" used here because it is the past participle of "marry" or the reason is that it is a well-known adjective? Are we allowed to make sentences with "will+be+the past participle" or only when the past participle is a well-known adjective (listed in the dictionaries as adjective)?

    Khorso, I got this example "will be marrid for 30 years" from a grammar text-book by Ron Cowan "The teacher's grammar of English". There is a passage that explanes that such things might be heard in AmE.

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    #5

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    ***In January we will (have been) (be) married for 30 years.***


    I was just thinking whether according to the above given information the following sentence might be interpreted in two different ways??

    ***When you guys come I will be watching the soccer finals for 30 minutes.**

    If somebody said that, I would understad it in two different ways depending on the contex

    1)If it's written on the test or uttered semiformally it would mean that when they come the speaker will start watching and continue to do that for 30 minutes??

    Only one question mark is required! Yes, that could be the meaning, but it would be more usual to mention time of arrival for clarification. Either formally or informally - there is no semiformally.

    2)If the above given sentence was preceded with another sentence like "It's too bad you can't get off work earlier." and was uttered informally, I would understand it as when they come after work to watch the game I will have been watching it for 30 minutes???
    You should still use 'I will have been', again a time indication would help.

    There are some assumptions here. If the guys know the time for kick-off they will understand that you will have watched the game for 30 minutes before their due arrival. If they do not know the time for kick-off then they would understand that you would be watching the game for 30 minutes after their arrival.
    Thanks a lot for your advice. If a person threw in already "will+already+be, would that eliminate ambiguity?

  3. Khosro's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Khorso, I got this example "will be marrid for 30 years" from a grammar text-book by Ron Cowan "The teacher's grammar of English". There is a passage that explanes that such things might be heard in AmE.
    Yes you are right. I have no problem with this sentence being correct and I think it is a good sentence, but why? My question is not about future perfect in comparison to "will+be+past participle". I just want to know if we use "married" because it is just a "past participle" or because it is an adjective.

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    #7

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    Yes you are right. I have no problem with this sentence being correct and I think it is a good sentence, but why? My question is not about future perfect in comparison to "will+be+past participle". I just want to know if we use "married" because it is just a "past participle" or because it is an adjective.
    Logic tells me that this married functions as predicate adjective here. Otherwise, the meaning would be as if someone will have been married (by a priest) for 30 years. Mind you, before married is an adjective, it's the past participle, not the other way round.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    Of course, you could save yourself a lot of trouble by saying 'It's our thirtieth anniversary next January'!

    b

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    #9

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "The future perfect can also be used to express states that will have endured in the future for a period time as measured at some future date"

    ***This coming January we will have been married for 30 years.***

    "In some American dialects, a pattern consisting of will+be+the past participle,which expresses the state of being, is substituted for future perfect. Thus one is often likely to hear''

    ***In January we will be married for 30 years.***


    I was just thinking whether according to the above given information the following sentence might be interpreted in two different ways?

    ***When you guys come I will be watching the soccer finals for 30 minutes.**

    If somebody said that, I would understad it in two different ways depending on the contex

    1)If it's written on the test or uttered semiformally it would mean that when they come the speaker will start watching and continue to do that for 30 minutes?

    2)If the above given sentence was preceded with another sentence like "It's too bad you can't get off work earlier." and was uttered informally, I would understand it as when they come after work to watch the game I will have been watching it for 30 minutes?


    *********SORRY FOR A TYPO IN THE HEADING**********
    I am not a teacher.

    As for marriage, lazy and semi-literate Americans will say that, and the rest of us might on occasion. It's equivalent to, "We will be 30 years married." "Married" gets that treatment because it is intrinsically, insistently ongoing and doesn't need no stinking verbs to help it.

    "Watching" is on its own. It needs some tensing to guy it. Nobody I've ever spoken with here would say, "When you guys come I will be watching the soccer finals for 30 minutes" when they mean "When you guys come I'll've been watching the soccer finals for 30 minutes."

  6. apex2000's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: will be marrided for 30 years in January

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Thanks a lot for your advice. If a person threw in already "will+already+be, would that eliminate ambiguity?
    There is no need for 'already'. It also makes the sentence awkward.

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