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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    Does by work in the below? I think so, maybe it means "amount" or "dividing criteria"

    ex)The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each.

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    #2

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    Only in works here (and maybe into).

    Rover

  3. Khosro's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Does by work in the below? I think so, maybe it means "amount" or "dividing criteria"

    ex)The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each.
    Since I know that you are practicing "below","over", ... I recommend that you say:"Does by work in the sentence below?"

    below could be a preposition or adverb. It is not a noun. You can't say "in the below".

    In Persian we also say "below's sentence" and "the sentence in the below" but that's wrong in English!

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    Since I know that you are practicing "below","over", ... I recommend that you say:"Does by work in the sentence below?"

    below could be a preposition or adverb. It is not a noun. You can't say "in the below".

    In Persian we also say "below's sentence" and "the sentence in the below" but that's wrong in English!
    Below works as a noun,too.
    This is from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/below

    below

    1) below (adverb)
    1. 2) below (preposition)
    2. 3) below (noun)
    3. 4) below (adjective)
    4. below-the-line
    5. bail below
    6. strike below
    7. belt (noun)



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    #5

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    You can say "in the below" but it doesn't sound natural.

  6. Khosro's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    1- Oxford dictionary and Macmillan dictionary does not explain "below" as a noun.

    2- Webster has an entry for it as a noun. It gives no example. further more, for other functions of "below" Webster lead the reader to another page with a link titled as "See below as defined for English-language learners", but for "below" as a name it has no such page.

    3- Even if "below" is acceptable as a noun, I have serious daubts that it can be used the way you used it:"Does by work in the below?"

    4- I thanked you because I like examining everything before accepting it as a truth.

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    #7

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    "In the following" is more idiomatic.

  8. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    Whether you call "below" a noun, or an adverb + noun or adj + noun with the noun ellipted, the following seem OK to me:
    See the following; refer to the above, regarding the aforementioned;
    (In an email) see the attached
    etc.

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    #9

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Whether you call "below" a noun, or an adverb + noun or adj + noun with the noun ellipted, the following seem OK to me:
    See the following; refer to the above, regarding the aforementioned;
    (In an email) see the attached
    etc.
    I think I understand now.

  10. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: The boys cut the cake in(by) two and ate half each?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Whether you call "below" a noun, or an adverb + noun or adj + noun with the noun ellipted, the following seem OK to me:
    See the following; refer to the above, regarding the aforementioned;
    (In an email) see the attached
    etc.
    ... though 'aforementioned' is a bit formal for some tastes. I find it interesting that near-opposite of 'the above' is 'the following'; 'the below' - as that dictionary implies is archaic. (In fact, I'd say that in keannu's 'Below works as a noun' the tense was wrong: it worked as a noun at one time. )

    b

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