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    #1

    fit the description

    Hello,

    We can say that a person fits the description of something, but can we say that a description fits a person?

    For examlple,

    Does the description for your score (of the quiz) fit you?

    Thank you!

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: fit the description

    I was about to say 'yes', until I saw your example, which makes me suspect that you might have the wrong idea. Someone can indeed fit a description, though I think it's more natural to say a person meets a description; I've also heard fill and fulfil.

    But in your example I think you mean something like 'Are you happy/satisfied/content/pleased... with your score?' Another possibility is 'Do you think your score gives an accurate assessment of your ability?'- or just 'is it fair?'/'Is it what you expected?'/'Does it match your expectation?'...

    b

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    #3

    Re: fit the description

    Thank you, BobK.

    I'm afraid that 'expectations' and 'asessments' might not be appropriate for some contexts.. For example, a person reads a text describing people's characters depending on their birth oder/sleeping position/eating habits etc. I think the safest way to find out if they agree with the description is to ask "Does it describe you well?" or "Do you agree with the description?" or "Do you meet the description" (which you have suggested), but I was just wondering if 'fit' works in such contexts too.
    Last edited by Verona_82; 16-Feb-2011 at 21:24. Reason: typos :(

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: fit the description

    Another increasingly common expression is 'fit the profile'. This started life in the context of crime detection. The police would draw up a 'profile' of a criminal (if TV is anything to go by, there are even peopel called 'profilers') - say 'mid-twenties, lives with his mother, goes to the cinema once a week...'. Investigairs pay special to suspects who 'fit the profile'.

    But in the last few years it's been used outside that police context - usually to refer to 'repeat offenders' not of a criminal kind.

    b

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: fit the description

    Another increasingly common expression is 'fit the profile'. This started life in the context of crime detection. The police would draw up a 'profile' of a criminal (if TV is anything to go by, there are even people called 'profilers') - say 'mid-twenties, lives with his mother, goes to the cinema once a week...'. Investigators pay special to suspects who 'fit the profile'.

    But in the last few years it's been used outside that police context - usually to refer to 'repeat offenders' not of a criminal kind.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 17-Feb-2011 at 14:06. Reason: Fix typo

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    #6

    Re: fit the description

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I was about to say 'yes', until I saw your example, which makes me suspect that you might have the wrong idea. Someone can indeed fit a description, though I think it's more natural to say a person meets a description; I've also heard fill and fulfil.
    I've also come across the phrase answer (to) the descrption (of).

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