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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Assamese
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    I am angry with your misbehaviour?

    I am angry with your misbehaviour.

    Is this sentence grammatically acceptable, at least in spoken English and if no, why not? I've heard the word 'angry' being used like this by native speakers many times.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2010
    • Posts: 5,098
    #2

    Re: I am angry with your misbehaviour?

    Your sentence's grammar is perfectly fine.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,609
    #3

    Re: I am angry with your misbehaviour?

    It's not very natural. You could say "I'm angry with you" or "I'm angry about your behaviour".

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