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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    go + red, mad... is the same as get?

    Hi!

    I've seen some sentences in which go seems to have the same sense of get...

    Like:

    He's going crazy...
    She's shy... She's going red.
    I'm going mad...
    Josh went angry

    my questions are: When should I use go or get? When exactly can I use "go" istead of "get"?
    Is it correct? too informal? Does it have the same sense as "turn"?

    She's turning red

    Thanks in advance!

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: go + red, mad... is the same as get?

    Quote Originally Posted by tais_n View Post
    Hi!

    I've seen some sentences in which go seems to have the same sense of get...

    Like:

    He's going crazy... This could mean either "He is behaving crazily" or "He is becoming crazy". You can use "getting" instead of "becoming".
    She's shy... She's going red. "Becoming/getting" are both possible.
    I'm going mad... As above.
    Josh went angry This is incorrect. You could say "Josh got/became angry".

    my questions are: When should I use go or get? When exactly can I use "go" istead of "get"?
    Is it correct? too informal? Does it have the same sense as "turn"?

    She's turning red

    Thanks in advance!
    Bhai.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: go + red, mad... is the same as get?

    Be careful with 'mad'. If a person goes mad s/he becomes insane, but a person gets mad s/he gets angry (with a tinge of American-ness - Br Eng doesn't use 'mad' in this sense so often - though we use it in borrowed sporting idioms like 'Don't get mad get even'. Generally - as a first approximation (I haven't thought long and hard about this) - getting is temporary and going is more permanent, and a polysemous word like 'mad' can change meaning to reflect this general tendency.

    b

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    #4

    Re: go + red, mad... is the same as get?

    Quote Originally Posted by tais_n View Post
    Hi!

    I've seen some sentences in which go seems to have the same sense of get...

    Like:

    He's going crazy...
    She's shy... She's going red.
    I'm going mad...
    Josh went angry

    my questions are: When should I use go or get? When exactly can I use "go" istead of "get"?
    Is it correct? too informal? Does it have the same sense as "turn"?

    She's turning red

    Thanks in advance!
    In the dialect of English I speak (American English), to go crazy is idiomatically common. You can go mad if you use mad in the sense of insane (more common in British English). If you use mad in the sense of angry, then it sounds more natural to say, "I'm getting mad."
    If you never used a form of to go in the other examples, your English would sound just fine.

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    #5

    Re: go + red, mad... is the same as get?

    I am not a teacher.

    In the US, "getting crazy" means something like acting up, behaving outlandishly or exuberantly, displaying energetic enthusiasm. But "He's getting crazier and crazier" means that he's becoming more and more mentally unstable.

    "Going crazy" literally means becoming insane, but we can, of course, use "crazy" figuratively. "To go mad" is reserved for rabid dogs, because the fossilized phrase "mad dog" is used for them.

  4. Newbie
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    #6

    Re: go + red, mad... is the same as get?

    Many Thanks to everyone!

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