Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 1,742
    #1

    Question "flannel"...unnecessary words...

    Hi,
    When we ask somebody to leave out the flannel that's because they're talking a lot to dodge what we expect them to tell us (the answer to a question, the truth, etc.). Can flannel be used as a verb, or is there any idiom meaning the same?
    Can 'beat about the bush' be used in this case?


    Cheers!

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,598
    #2

    Re: "flannel"...unnecessary words...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,
    When we ask somebody to leave out the flannel that's because they're talking a lot to dodge what we expect them to tell us (the answer to a question, the truth, etc.). Can flannel be used as a verb, or is there any idiom meaning the same?
    Can 'beat about the bush' be used in this case?


    Cheers!
    Yes, "to flannel", meaning to talk a lot around a subject without getting to the point, is a verb. It's meaning is similar to "to beat about the bush" but I see it as using soft persuasive language in particular. (That may simply be because of my mentally associating it with flannel fabric).

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 1,742
    #3

    Question Re: "flannel"...unnecessary words...

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Yes, "to flannel", meaning to talk a lot around a subject without getting to the point, is a verb. It's meaning is similar to "to beat about the bush" but I see it as using soft persuasive language in particular. (That may simply be because of my mentally associating it with flannel fabric).

    Thanks a lot. I used to think that one would flannel because they don't want to say something (out of fear, embarrassment, etc.), while they would 'beat about the bush' when they don't know how to put it, or just don't stick to the point. In other words, one may (sometimes) beat about the bush unconsciously. Is that right?

  4. nyota's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 615
    #4

    Re: "flannel"...unnecessary words...

    I know you've already got your answer but I thought I'd share some info since the word 'flannel' caught my attention once, too. Here's the context for it (it's from a British comedy show called "Keeping up appearances"),

    Daisy: Onslow?
    Onslow: Hmm?
    D: What's limpid?
    O: What?!
    D: What's limpid? As in, "he gazed into her limpid eyes." L-I-M-P-I-D. Limpid eyes. That's what it says here.
    O: Almost certainly a disease of the retina.Little scabs on the retina. You get it from reading too many library books and ignoring close relatives who are dying for a cup of tea.
    D: You made all that up, didn't you?
    O:You say that to me, a regular viewer of "the open university"?
    D: You're full of flannel, Onslow.
    O: Ah, yes, but educated flannel. Flannel up to degree standard.

  5. Mehrgan's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 1,742
    #5

    Re: "flannel"...unnecessary words...

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    I know you've already got your answer but I thought I'd share some info since the word 'flannel' caught my attention once, too. Here's the context for it (it's from a British comedy show called "Keeping up appearances"),

    Daisy: Onslow?
    Onslow: Hmm?
    D: What's limpid?
    O: What?!
    D: What's limpid? As in, "he gazed into her limpid eyes." L-I-M-P-I-D. Limpid eyes. That's what it says here.
    O: Almost certainly a disease of the retina.Little scabs on the retina. You get it from reading too many library books and ignoring close relatives who are dying for a cup of tea.
    D: You made all that up, didn't you?
    O:You say that to me, a regular viewer of "the open university"?
    D: You're full of flannel, Onslow.
    O: Ah, yes, but educated flannel. Flannel up to degree standard.

    Thank you dear nyota! Very interesting!

Similar Threads

  1. Unnecessary 'is"?
    By Kellawally in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2009, 06:25
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Sep-2008, 11:33
  3. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33
  4. Please help me find 5 unnecessary words in the text
    By Oprica Laura in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 15-Jul-2007, 13:51
  5. pronunciation of the words "police" and "polite"?
    By dihen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Mar-2006, 03:56

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •