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    #1

    feel like

    When we say "I feel like KFC, McDonalds or just french fries", is colloquial for "I feel like eating at KFC, McDonalds or having some french fries"? Can I say "I feel like black coffee"?

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    #2

    Re: feel like

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "I feel like KFC, McDonalds or just french fries"
    I would not say this, though I feel it is possible. In the highly unlikely event of my wanting vile fast food, I would be far more likely to say, "I feel like eating at KFC, McDonalds or having some french fries".
    Can I say "I feel like black coffee"?
    Yes, though, unless I felt a desperate need for a strong dose of caffeine, I would be more likely to say, "I feel like a black coffee".

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    #3

    Re: feel like

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I would not say this, though I feel it is possible. In the highly unlikely event of my wanting vile fast food, I would be far more likely to say, "I feel like eating at KFC, McDonalds or having some french fries".
    Yes, though, unless I felt a desperate need for a strong dose of caffeine, I would be more likely to say, "I feel like a black coffee".
    I am not a teacher.

    Me, too.

    I think we "feel like" a more general word. I might feel like pizza, but I can't feel like deep-dish garbage pizza so much. That wants an "a" in it. I can feel like Chinese, but not General Tso's chicken, which wants a "some".

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    #4

    Re: feel like

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolfootluke View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    Me, too.

    I think we "feel like" a more general word. I might feel like pizza, but I can't feel like deep-dish garbage pizza so much. That wants an "a" in it. I can feel like Chinese, but not General Tso's chicken, which wants a "some".
    What if I wanted to eat at McDonalds or KFC just any food from either restaurants being in a foreign country, could I say "I feel like McDonalds"?

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    #5

    Re: feel like

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What if I wanted to eat at McDonalds or KFC just any food from either restaurants being in a foreign country, could I say "I feel like McDonalds"?
    Ostap,
    I said explicitly in post #2 that I would not say this. Coolfootluke suggested in post #3 that he would not.

    If you want to say, "I feel like McDonalds", do so. In certain contexts, such as a response to "Do you fancy (going to) KFC this evening?" it might even be natural.

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    #6

    Re: feel like

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    What if I wanted to eat at McDonalds or KFC just any food from either restaurants being in a foreign country, could I say "I feel like McDonalds"?
    I am not a teacher.

    That works here. But you cannot say, "I feel like Big Mac." You would have to say "I feel like a Big Mac." The major chains are general enough in my dialect (Middle Atlantic, USA).

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    #7

    Re: feel like

    Just to reinforce Coolfoot's point, "I feel like KFC/McDonald's" would be entirely natural in my part of the world, as would "I feel like coffee" on the other hand, I would definitely "feel like a beer".
    Right now in fact.

    not a teacher

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    #8

    Re: feel like

    I'd say I feel like a beer in the same way, but in a restaurant when people were deciding whether to have beer or wine, I feel like beer would work for me as a way of expressing a preference.

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