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    #1

    Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    Hi, I have a hard time finding the right English expression or word for the French word "gourmandise" (not in the pejorative way).Can anybody help me. Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    a taste and relish for good food.

  1. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    Gourmand or epicurean, perhaps. In colloquial AmE, the term "foodie" has become popular to describe a person who loves food and likes to try different types of restaurants/cuisines.

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    #4

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    I am not a teacher.

    "Gourmandise" is an English mass noun, pronounced "-EEZ", which MW defines as "appreciation of or interest in good food and drink". I do not think that it is especially pejorative in English.

    There is also "epicureanism", which tends to be taken more like "hedonism", but in the right context it should be OK. The word "epicurean" has to do with food, but when you start piling on the suffixes, it mutates.

    There seems to be no word of this kind that stems directly from "gourmet". Interesting.
    Last edited by Coolfootluke; 01-Mar-2011 at 04:05. Reason: wrong quote

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    #5

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    It could also mean a 'connoisseur of gourmet food'

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    There's an archaic (but occasionally used) word for someone who likes his food - in quantity rather than quality. He (well, I've never met a woman like this ) is a 'trencherman'. (A Trencher (tableware) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia was the thick slice of bread that food was served on before plates became popular - centuries ago; come to think of it, it must be related to the French tranche.)

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    #7

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    In BrE, a gourmand can be used to mean either a gourmet or a glutton, so it can have a pejorative undertone, though I doubt that many gourmands would be very bothered about it.

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    #8

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    In BrE, a gourmand can be used to mean either a gourmet or a glutton...
    This has passed me by! To me a 'gourmet' is un gourmet and a 'gourmand' is un gourmamd; silly me for attributing too much influence to etymology

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    #9

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    Just Googling the word showed that several bakeries and restaurants in the US use the word gourmandise as their name.

    It's a beautifully sounding word, isn't it?

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    #10

    Re: Translation of "gourmandise" into English

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    silly me

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