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    #1

    It v This

    Hi all,
    my first post here, so please be kind!

    I'm having issues explaining the use of 'it' v 'this' based on a section in 'Ready for IELTS' (p.108 if you have the book)

    'It' is said to replace a noun, while 'these' replaces no specific noun but rather the action of the previous sentence.

    e.g. As the region is full of large farms, it is very rich.
    The cost of farming has increased dramatically over the period. This (rise) has led to inflation.
    Where 'rise' can be dropped.

    Generally the distinction I mentioned above seems to work well, but it hits problems here:
    'I like visiting the seaside when nobody is around, it's very relaxing.'

    'it' would seem to replace the action and doesn't replace a particular noun, and 'this' sounds awful or pompous (to my ears anyway)


    ideas:
    is 'it' the only option in personal situations?
    is 'like' affecting the choice?
    is it something to do with 'visiting'? The noun to go with 'this' really sounds clunky 'this visiting'?

    Anyway I'm lost with how to explain it, so any ideas welcome!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: It v This

    Quote Originally Posted by nparslow View Post
    Hi all,
    my first post here, so please be kind!

    I'm having issues explaining the use of 'it' v 'this' based on a section in 'Ready for IELTS' (p.108 if you have the book)

    'It' is said to replace a noun, while 'these' replaces no specific noun but rather the action of the previous sentence.

    e.g. As the region is full of large farms, it is very rich.
    The cost of farming has increased dramatically over the period. This (rise) has led to inflation.
    Where 'rise' can be dropped.

    Generally the distinction I mentioned above seems to work well, but it hits problems here:
    'I like visiting the seaside when nobody is around, it's very relaxing.'

    'it' would seem to replace the action and doesn't replace a particular noun, and 'this' sounds awful or pompous (to my ears anyway)


    ideas:
    is 'it' the only option in personal situations?
    is 'like' affecting the choice?
    is it something to do with 'visiting'? The noun to go with 'this' really sounds clunky 'this visiting'?

    Anyway I'm lost with how to explain it, so any ideas welcome!
    Which is relaxing, the visiting or the seaside?

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