Poll: Is this a palindrome or an oxymoron?

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  1. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #1

    Madam, I'm Adam.

    Which is it?

  2. #2

    Re: Madam, I'm Adam.

    It is a Palindrome. A Palindrome is a phrase or word that reads the same from left to right as it does from right to left. eg.

    Straw Wart
    Racecar

    There is a finnish word meaning the result from a measurement laboratory of tomatoes, "SOLUTOMAATTIMITTAAMOTULOS" which is a palindrome!
    An Oxymoron on the other hand, is a phrase that is paradoxical. It usually accors with a phase made up of an adjective then noun. Examples:

    "Wise fool"

    Or it can be an adverb - noun phrase eg.

    "Inertly Strong."

    It is usually used to emphasize hypocrisy, incongruities or the complex nature of reality.


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    #3

    Re: Madam, I'm Adam.

    I voted for Palindrome..
    according to me Oxymorons (or oxymora) are literary figures of speech usually composed of a pair of neighbouring contradictory words (often within a sentence). However this is not always the case. The Webster Dictionary defines oxymoron as "a combination of contradictory or incongruous words".

    Oxymorons can be used for dramatic effect, for example: Hell's Angels and deafening silence.

    Single-word Oxymora Composed of Dependent Morphemes
    The more in oxymoron also gives us the more in sophomore, a "wise fool" – and there are indeed many sophomoric sophomores. Other examples: pianoforte ("soft-loud"), preposterous ("before-after"), and superette ("big-small").
    Single-word Oxymora Composed of Independent Morphemes
    Two meaning-bearing elements that could each be a word in itself are welded together into a single word: spendthrift, bridegroom, bittersweet, ballpoint, speechwriting, firewater and someone.
    Logological Oxymora
    If we view words as surface letter combinations and disregard meaning, we note that the word nook joins the opposing words no and OK, and the name Noyes, no and yes. I welcome additional specimens from Word Ways readers.
    Natural Oxymora
    Most speakers of English who know the definition of an oxymoron would have little trouble identifying the pairs inside out, student teacher, working vacation and small fortune as oxymora. I call this major category of oxymoronology "natural" because the perception of these duos as oxymora is relatively direct and effortless and does not depend on plays on words or personal values

  3. Mad-ox's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Madam, I'm Adam.

    I think it is a palindrome as my Mcmillan dyctionary says like this" a word or phrase is the same whether you read it forwards or backwards, such as noon or not a ton". Have a nice day, bye

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    #5

    Re: Madam, I'm Adam.

    I've just known what is a "palindrome" and an "Oxymoron" so I might give the wrong answer any way is it a "Palindrome"?

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    #6

    Re: Madam, I'm Adam.

    It certainly is a palindrome. Palindrome is Greek and is derived from "palin", which means "again" or, as here, "in reverse manner" + "dromos", which means "road" or "distance covered". So, the meaning is "to cover the same distance forth and back". So, a palindrome reads exactly the same, whether you read it from left to right or from right to left.

    The most well-known Greek palindrome is "Ni[ps]on anomemata me monan o[ps]in" ([ps] in Greek is spelled with one letter only, that is with the letter psi). The phrase means: Wash (off) your sins, not only your face.


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    #7

    Re: Madam, I'm Adam.

    Spanish: Dabale arroz el abad a la zorra. (Something like The monk gave the fox (female fox) rice)


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    #8

    Re: Madam, I'm Adam.

    Besides, I didn't know what an oxymoron is: it sounded like some kind of stuff you can wash your clothes with, some brand of washing powder. But now, thanks to this, and with the help of my dictionary, I know I was right and I also know a new concept. Thanks

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    #9

    Re: Madam, I'm Adam.

    if everyone one thinks palindrome, i think same.... i dont know about any of them actually.... but from reading above posts, i have an idea...

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