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  1. saddouda's Avatar
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    #1

    grammar

    Hello again
    i have wondered about two of sentences
    let it go and easy come ,easy go
    why are not they let it goes
    and easy comes easy goes

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: grammar

    The verbs let and make take a bare infinitive:

    [1a] She let it go.
    [1b] She made it go.


    The infinitive marker (to) appears with the causative verbs cause and allow: [1c] She caused it to go.
    [1d] She allowed it to go.



    The aphorism Easy come, easy go is similar in structure to First come, first served, the longer version of which might be something like:


    [2] The first person to come is the first person to be served => First come, first served.


    The verb come is a bare infinitive (from to come); the past participle served is an adjective (from to be served). The longer version of Easy come, easy go might be something like,


    [3] That which is easy to come is easy to go => Easy come, easy go.


    The word easy is an adjective, the words come and go are bare infinitives.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: grammar

    That was a helpful answer, Soup, but I disagree with you on:
    The verb come is a bare infinitive (from to come);
    I don't feel that 'come' is from 'to come'. 'Come' is, as you say, the bare infinitive. The two words 'to come', once referred to simply as 'the infinitive' (largely because these two words in combination frequently served the same purpose as the one-word infinitive in Latin), are now usually referred to as the 'to-infinitive'.

    If one of the forms is more basic than the other, I would go for the single word.

    This does not affect anything else you said.

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    I don't feel that 'come' is from 'to come'.
    '...(from to come [in example sentence [2]])... .'

  5. saddouda's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: grammar

    Oh , thank you so much for your help , it clarified a lot of ambiguity in my head , thanks a million for all of you

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