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  1. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #1

    How do you say in English?

    1. The sound made by the wind in the tube.
    2. The sound you hear under your feet while walking on the snow on a frosty day.
    3. And finally "ears" become red on a frosty day... Are they hot (red) or there is another word for it?

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    #2

    Re: How do you say in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Smith View Post
    1. The sound made by the wind in the tube.
    2. The sound you hear under your feet while walking on the snow on a frosty day.
    3. And finally "ears" become red on a frosty day... Are they hot (red) or there is another word for it?

    *just an assistant ESL teacher

    I think different people will have different answers for this.

    1. could be a whistling sound.
    2. crunch crunch
    3. I would just say they are red. I wouldn't say they are hot.



  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: How do you say in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by marmoset View Post
    I think different people will have different answers for this.
    They may, I suppose. Your answers appear to me to be the most natural.

  3. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: How do you say in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by marmoset View Post
    *just an assistant ESL teacher

    I think different people will have different answers for this.

    1. could be a whistling sound.
    2. crunch crunch
    3. I would just say they are red. I wouldn't say they are hot.


    Can we say: The wind was whistling in the tube...?
    The snow was crunching under my feet...?
    My ears have turned red on a frosty day...?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: How do you say in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Smith View Post
    Can we say: The wind was whistling in the tube...?Yes
    The snow was crunching under my feet...? Yes
    My ears have turned red on a frosty day...? Yes, though the tense is unusual. More natural examples would be:
    My ears have turned red.
    My ears turned red that frosty day.
    5

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    #6

    Re: How do you say in English?

    Alternatively, you can use "Scrunch" for the sound.

  5. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: How do you say in English?

    What does " in it for life" mean in the following sentence:I'm not a monarchist, but an Elizabethist. She’s hard-working, gracious, courteous, conscientious, well-judged, dignified, steadfast “in it for life”. (The Times about Elizabeth II)?

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    #8

    Re: How do you say in English?

    I'm not a monarchist, but an Elizabethist. She’s hard-working, gracious, courteous, conscientious, well-judged, dignified, steadfast “in it for life”. (The Times about Elizabeth II)?

    Harry.
    – "in it for life" suggests that the person intends to stay on in their position until death. In the case of the Elizabeth II, there has at times been talk of her abdicating to allow Charles to ascend the throne at some point in the future. It would be fair to say that the general opinion, which the writer clearly shares, is that she will stay on until the end.

    not a teacher

  6. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: How do you say in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    I'm not a monarchist, but an Elizabethist. She’s hard-working, gracious, courteous, conscientious, well-judged, dignified, steadfast “in it for life”. (The Times about Elizabeth II)?

    Harry.
    – "in it for life" suggests that the person intends to stay on in their position until death. In the case of the Elizabeth II, there has at times been talk of her abdicating to allow Charles to ascend the throne at some point in the future. It would be fair to say that the general opinion, which the writer clearly shares, is that she will stay on until the end.

    not a teacher
    I agree with this but I'd add that it also suggest dedication to her position which the writer probably admires.

  7. Harry Smith's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: How do you say in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    I'm not a monarchist, but an Elizabethist. She’s hard-working, gracious, courteous, conscientious, well-judged, dignified, steadfast “in it for life”. (The Times about Elizabeth II)?

    Harry.
    – "in it for life" suggests that the person intends to stay on in their position until death. In the case of the Elizabeth II, there has at times been talk of her abdicating to allow Charles to ascend the throne at some point in the future. It would be fair to say that the general opinion, which the writer clearly shares, is that she will stay on until the end.

    not a teacher
    Thanks a lot! There are things we understand here but we need native speakers to feel their meanings too...

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