Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Kurdish
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 8
    #1

    Exact/proper interpretation

    Hello everybody;

    My question is regarding to the exact translation of this sentece:

    "For the reign of Sarduri I (c. 840830 bc) there remain only the inscriptions at Van"

    I interpreted it as "from the period in which Sarduri I was reigning there remain only inscriptions at Van" (id est maybe there were inscriptions in other places but what we currently remain for us are the inscriptions at Van [a city in modern Turkey]).

    But our professor explicitly rejected my interpretation and affirmed the following instead:

    "During the reign of Sarduri I [he] created only inscriptions at Van" (namely he was not interested in leaving too much inscriptions everywhere as opposed to his son).

    So I wanted to know what is the exact or proper translation of this sentence?

    Thanks in advance

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,104
    #2

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    Quote Originally Posted by Designare View Post
    Hello everybody;

    My question is regarding to the exact translation of this sentece:

    "For the reign of Sarduri I (c. 840830 bc) there remain only the inscriptions at Van"

    I interpreted it as "from the period in which Sarduri I was reigning there remain only inscriptions at Van" (id est maybe there were inscriptions in other places but what we currently remain for us are the inscriptions at Van [a city in modern Turkey]).

    But our professor explicitly rejected my interpretation and affirmed the following instead:

    "During the reign of Sarduri I [he] created only inscriptions at Van" (namely he was not interested in leaving too much inscriptions everywhere as opposed to his son).

    So I wanted to know what is the exact or proper translation of this sentence?

    Thanks in advance
    'Translation' is the wrong word. You could use 'interpretation'.
    Your interpretation is correct, given the sentence. What your professor says might be factual, but you can't derive that meaning from that sentence. Perhaps there is more context surrounding that sentence that would support your professor's reading.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 434
    #3

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    I am not a teacher.

    I need more context. I can't tell from that single sentence.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    By the way, we never write, or say, 'id est' in full. We use 'i.e.', 'ie' or 'that is'.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #5

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    "There remain..." implies, to me, that there were others. But these are all that still exist.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 434
    #6

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "There remain..." implies, to me, that there were others. But these are all that still exist.
    I am not a teacher.

    I thought of that, but what if the sentence (there is no stop at the end) continues: "For the reign of Sarduri I (c. 840830 bc) there remain only the inscriptions at Van to be translated."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #7

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolfootluke View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    I thought of that, but what if the sentence (there is no stop at the end) continues: "For the reign of Sarduri I (c. 840830 bc) there remain only the inscriptions at Van to be translated."
    Same idea.

    I would read your sentence as there were other inscriptions, but only these have yet to be translated.

    I don't think "remains" are the totality of a set of something. The remains of a body are not the entire body. The remains of a civilization are not everything that civilization made.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Kurdish
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 8
    #8

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    'Translation' is the wrong word. You could use 'interpretation'.
    Yes I you're right. Here I used "translation" spontaneously because at my class I was translating the passage into Persian.


    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Your interpretation is correct, given the sentence. What your professor says might be factual, but you can't derive that meaning from that sentence. Perhaps there is more context surrounding that sentence that would support your professor's reading.
    Thanks for your reply. Here is the full passage (it is actually an article in Britannica on Urartu-an anicent Middle Eastern civilization):

    "For the reign of Sarduri I (c. 840830 bc) there remain only the inscriptions. But for the reigns of his son Ishpuini (c. 830-810) and especially of Ishpuini's son Meinua (c. 810-781), Urartian conquests can be measured indirectly from widespread inscriptions ranging from the lower Murat River basin (around Elzig) in the west, to the Aras (Araks, Araxes) River (i.e., from Erzurum to Mount Ararat) in the north, and to the south shore of Lake Urmia in the southeast. Ardini, or Musasir, once conquered by Tiglath-pileser I of Assyria about 1100, now became part of the Urartian sphere of influence. The temple of Haldi at Ardini was richly endowed by the Urartian kings but was open to Assyrian worshipers."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Kurdish
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 8
    #9

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolfootluke View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    I thought of that, but what if the sentence (there is no stop at the end) continues: "For the reign of Sarduri I (c. 840830 bc) there remain only the inscriptions at Van to be translated."

    Thanks for your reply. Here is the full passage:

    "For the reign of Sarduri I (c. 840830 bc) there remain only the inscriptions. But for the reigns of his son Ishpuini (c. 830-810) and especially of Ishpuini's son Meinua (c. 810-781), Urartian conquests can be measured indirectly from widespread inscriptions ranging from the lower Murat River basin (around Elzig) in the west, to the Aras (Araks, Araxes) River (i.e., from Erzurum to Mount Ararat) in the north, and to the south shore of Lake Urmia in the southeast. Ardini, or Musasir, once conquered by Tiglath-pileser I of Assyria about 1100, now became part of the Urartian sphere of influence. The temple of Haldi at Ardini was richly endowed by the Urartian kings but was open to Assyrian worshipers."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Kurdish
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 8
    #10

    Re: Exact/proper translation

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Same idea.

    I would read your sentence as there were other inscriptions, but only these have yet to be translated.

    I don't think "remains" are the totality of a set of something. The remains of a body are not the entire body. The remains of a civilization are not everything that civilization made.
    Thanks for your reply. I just conceive the same of "remains".

    I only posted the rest of the paragraph in previous posts in order to draw a firm conclusion.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] exact(ly)
    By tintiman in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Mar-2010, 22:52
  2. [Idiom] what does in exact mean...?
    By JiriLindovsky in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Oct-2008, 17:03
  3. exact or exactly ?
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Oct-2008, 19:34
  4. looking for an exact word
    By lalda222 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Feb-2008, 12:43
  5. the exact meaning
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Apr-2004, 19:39

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •