Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Nov 2010
    • Posts: 21
    #1

    My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Hi,

    Apparently the first of the following sentences is incorrect while the second one is correct. Can anyone explain this, please?

    1) My parents have gotten married in Paris.
    2) My parents have bought a car in Paris.

  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 1,742
    #2

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by caminostro View Post
    Hi,

    Apparently the first of the following sentences is incorrect while the second one is correct. Can anyone explain this, please?

    1) My parents have gotten married in Paris.
    2) My parents have bought a car in Paris.


    The second sentence is given as a piece of news, which is why a present perfect is used. However, in the first sentence, the action was completed long ago, as the speaker is the child of those parents. I'd say, 'My dad has married again!' when I wanted to inform others of this, as a piece of news.

    Let's look forward to better replies.

  2. Mehrgan's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 1,742
    #3

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    Gil


    Sorry, you already answered the question when I was posting mine!

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #4

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Whatever the situation, 'have gotten married' is not acceptable in BrE.

  4. probus's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 3,459
    #5

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    Whatever the situation, 'have gotten married' is not acceptable in BrE.
    I was going to remark on that too. When I was in London people scoffed at my use of the word gotten. They said the word did not exist. It is a pure Americanism but standard on this side of the pond.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,630
    #6

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    I was going to remark on that too. When I was in London people scoffed at my use of the word gotten. They said the word did not exist. It is a pure Americanism but standard on this side of the pond.
    It's not a "pure Americanism" it was commonly used in England until the 18th century.

  6. probus's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 3,459
    #7

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Does gotten survive in the UK in the stock phrase ill-gotten gains? Or anywhere else?

  7. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #8

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    Does gotten survive in the UK in the stock phrase ill-gotten gains? Or anywhere else?
    I can think only of that expression, which we have in BrE. We have, of course forget - forgotten, and the only begotten son.

  8. nyota's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 615
    #9

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    1) My parents have gotten married in Paris.
    If you are trying to write that your parents were married in Paris some time ago - My parents got married in Paris.
    If your parents recently married - My parents have gotten married in Paris.
    If your parents married in the recent past - My parents have just gotten married in Paris
    .
    I don't quite get what the difference between recently and recent past is. But if I had to differentiate between the two, this is how I'd picture the way I understand them:

    recently ------------------x-----now ---------------->
    recent past -----------x---------now----------------->

    At the same time, just in the setence: My parents have just got married in Paris points to me to the more recent action which would collide with what Gil said. Is it that I understand the terms recently and recent past the other way round?

    My parents have got married in Paris. ---------x--------now------------>
    My parents have just got married in Paris. ----------x----now ----------->

  9. nyota's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 615
    #10

    Re: My parents have gotten married in Paris

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    "just" here is used if an action happened not too long ago.
    I got my promotion to major last week.
    I just got my promotion to major this morning.
    Yep, I understand how just works. I just didn't realise the phrase recent past means 'more recent' than recently.

    My parents have got married in Paris. ---------x--------now------------> recently
    My parents have just got married in Paris. ----------x----now -----------> recent past

    Thanks!


    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    At the same time, just in the setence: My parents have just got married in Paris points to me to the more recent action which would collide with what Gil said. Is it that I should understand the terms recently and recent past the other way round? Yes.
    1. I understand the terms the other way round (just informing what it's like, not what it 'should' be like). - Is it incorrect to say that?
    2. And now I should change that.

    BTW, understand something wrong or understand something wrongly?
    Did I understand it wrong/ly? Is it even natural to say that?
    Did I get it wrong? Perhaps this way?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. was married or had been married for 5 years
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 17-Feb-2011, 15:06
  2. [Vocabulary] gay Paris
    By maiabulela in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2010, 19:16
  3. I am/come frpm Paris ?
    By ph2004 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2009, 14:17
  4. He's never been to Paris....
    By Bluefields in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2009, 09:16
  5. Paris in the seventies
    By FW in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Oct-2003, 21:57

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •