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  1. beachboy's Avatar
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    #1

    to stop liking

    What's the difference between I've gone off something (doing something) and I've grown out of something (doing something)?

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to stop liking

    If you have gone off something you have simply tired of it. If you have outgrown something you have matured to the point where you no longer need or like it. Presumably you have moved on to higher and better things.

    By the way, "gone off" is BrE, not used in America.

  3. beachboy's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to stop liking

    How would Americans and Canadians convey the same idea as the British GO OFF?

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    #4

    Re: to stop liking

    Yes, Americans do say that.

    It's slang.

    I'm off the beer for a while. I'm on a diet.

    She's off dating him for a while.

    It means: I am no longer (using, eating, seeing, interacting with) or (reducing the amount)

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: to stop liking

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    I'm off the beer for a while. I'm on a diet.

    She's off dating him for a while.

    It means: I am no longer (using, eating, seeing, interacting with) or (reducing the amount)
    In BrE there's a difference.

    I've gone off beer - I don't like it any more.
    I'm off (the) beer -
    I've stopped drinking it (though I may still like it - too much, possibly)

  5. probus's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: to stop liking

    Yes. To be off is heard where I live, but to have gone off is not.

  6. probus's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: to stop liking

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    How would Americans and Canadians convey the same idea as the British GO OFF?
    I think we would say "I've quit ..." or "I'm fed up with ...".

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