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    #1

    future tense

    Hi everyone,
    Which sentence is correct? Why?
    1) By the end of the week her name will be known by everyone.
    2) By the end of the week her name will have been known by everyone.
    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: future tense

    Quote Originally Posted by mehdihas View Post
    Hi everyone,

    Which sentence is correct? Why?
    1) By the end of the week her name will be known by everyone.
    2) By the end of the week her name will have been known by everyone.

    Thanks.


    ****** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Medihas,


    (1) I think that both sentences are correct.

    (2) I think that the second sentence is definitely correct, but

    probably your first sentence is more common -- because native

    speakers seldom (or never) use the future perfect. (Professor

    George O. Curme says that Shakespeare never used it.)

    (3) Here is some information I wish to share (my sources at the end

    of this post).

    (a) One expert says, "[T]he future perfect tense is rarely used

    outside of Choice Written English, ..." He says that people

    prefer to say (and even write): "Marcia's ship will sail before we

    reach the dock" instead of "Marcia's ship will have sailed ...."

    (b) Another expert says, "[T]he future perfect tense has been

    largely replaced by the simple future tense." He says that

    people prefer "He will finish the work by next Saturday" instead of

    "He will have finished ...."

    (c) And one expert says that many people have different ways to avoid

    using the future perfect. For example, few would say: "I shall have

    finished the work before you return." Instead, they feel more comfortable

    with:

    I will be through with the work before you return./ I will have the work

    finished before you return.

    (d) Finally, one expert gives these examples:

    I'll have completed my exams by this Tuesday. > I will finish taking my

    exams by this Tuesday.

    I hope the new bed will have arrived by the time my parents get here. >

    I really want the new bed to arrive before my ....

    Sources:

    George O. Curme, A Grammar of the English Language (Essex, Connecticut: Verbatim, 1983), II, 372.

    Walter Kay Smart, English Review Grammar (Englewood Cliffs:
    Prentice-Hall, 1940).

    Paul Roberts, Understanding Grammar (New York: Harper & Row, 1954).

    Neal Chambers, "The Basics of Future Perfect," englishspark.com

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    #3

    Re: future tense

    I know that in casual AmE we would choose #1

    Not a teacher

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