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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #1

    In a restaurant: "take away/out/off"

    Hi, there.
    Pretending I am in a restaurant and I want some things to be removed from the table, but I don't want the rest of a meal to be packed into a box for me.
    Can I say like this?
    1. Remove it
    2. Take it
    3. Take it away
    4. Take it off
    5. Take it out

    What of them sounds more natural? What else you'd say in such a situation?
    1 and 2 sounds good for me.
    3 is a little bit confusing because when I said "yes" answering the waiter's question "Take away?" they gave me a box with the rest of a meal and that was sort of misunderstanding because I wanted them to take the rest of my meal away. So, does it mean that considering this situation (in a restaurant) take away = take away with client?

    Thanks for your reply.

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    #2

    Re: In a restaurant: "take away/out/off"

    AlexAD.

    In Brit/Aust/NZ English and probably elsewhere, "takeaway" food is what is called "take out" in AmEng. So that's where the confusion comes in.
    At a restaurant I would say: "We've finished, thank you" and the waiter should clear the table. If he hovers over some item he's not sure about you can help him with "Yes, you can take that".
    Taking your remaining food home from a restaurant is often referred to as having a "doggy bag", the idea being that the food is for your dog, which occasionally it may well be. This term is very widespread.
    If you want to say that you'd like to take it with you: "We've finished, could we have the rest to take home?". The waiter will say something like "Certainly, I'll get it ready for when you leave".. or he might even say "Sorry sir, we don't do doggy bags".

    not a teacher

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    #3

    Re: In a restaurant: "take away/out/off"

    Agree with J Murray here. "You can take it" also works... None of the suggestions on your list are polite.

    Not a teacher

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    #4

    Re: In a restaurant: "take away/out/off"

    I always indicate by positioning what is garbage and what I intend to keep. Plates, etc. pushed to the edge of the table are taken away.

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