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    #1

    sloppy, steep

    The floor of the outdoor playground is sloppy.

    The floor of the poutdoor layground is steep.

    What are the differences between sloppy and steep? Actually the floor is not very steep.

    ju

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    #2

    Re: sloppy, steep

    I am not a teacher.

    I'll bet you mean "sloping", not "sloppy". Is that right?

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    #3

    Re: sloppy, steep

    I am not a teacher.

    Bump. Am I allowed to bump here? I never read FAQs or legal crap.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: sloppy, steep

    I thought figuring it out it meant sloping instead of sloppy was brilliant.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: sloppy, steep

    I didn't twig to this straight away either, but when I saw Luke's post it occurred to me that perhaps "slopey" is the form in which Ju came across it.
    "Slopey" has a small representation on Google including two from the Wall Street Journal (both referring to golfing greens) and a couple of citations on COCA. But I have certainly heard it spoken many times.

    Either way I guess the answer for Ju is that when it's "sloping" (or "slopey") it's on a slant or an incline, and when it's very inclined it becomes "steep".

    not a teacher

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    #6

    Re: sloppy, steep

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolfootluke View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    I'll bet you mean "sloping", not "sloppy". Is that right?

    I'll bet you mean "sloping", not "sloppy". Is that right?


    Does I'll bet mean I believe ?

    Thank you.

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    #7

    Re: sloppy, steep

    Does I'll bet mean I believe ?

    Ju.
    In a sense, yes. It means to suggest something very confidently, the implication being that you are so sure of it that you would bet money on it.

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