Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. nyota's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 615
    #1

    I have yet to meet 'anyone' ...

    I have yet to meet anyone who can run as fast as him.

    Could I say, I have yet to meet someone who ... ?

  2. Khosro's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 530
    #2

    Re: I have yet to meet 'anyone' ...

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    I have yet to meet anyone who can run as fast as him.

    Could I say, I have yet to meet someone who ... ?
    What's the difference in your opinion?

    I think in the first sentence you just want to show your admire for him.
    In the second sentence you are perhaps a running coach and have recently lost your best runner and looking for a suitable substitute.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 2,944
    #3

    Re: I have yet to meet 'anyone' ...

    Either could be used, however in this context:

    anyone = out of every person you can even think of

    someone = more specifically an unknwon person

  3. nyota's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 615
    #4

    Re: I have yet to meet 'anyone' ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Khosro View Post
    What's the difference in your opinion?
    Khosro, I wasn't reallly thinking of any differences. I wasn't even sure if 'someone' was possible. ;)

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    someone = more specifically an unknwon person
    I don't quite get this one?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #5

    Re: I have yet to meet 'anyone' ...

    1. I have yet to meet anyone who can run as fast as him.
    2. I have yet to meet someone who ... ?

    In #1, 'anyone' is unrestricted - we may infer that the speaker is suggesting that s/he has tried all the possibilties.

    In#2, 'someone' is more restricted; we may infer that the speaker is suggesting that s/he has not (yet) tried all the possibilities.

    Michael Lewis [The English Verb, (1986), Hove: LTP] wrote:

    “Both some and any are used with indefinite reference.
    Some is used if the idea is restricted or limited in some way.
    Any is used if the idea is unrestricted or unlimited.
    Any applies to all or none; some applies to part.

    The restriction may be a real one – There’s some cheese in the fridge – or a psychological one, existing only in the mind of the speaker – Would you like something to eat?

    The real semantic distinction is as simple as that, and applies to all uses of some and any.

    Lewis could have added, "and to all words begining with some or any - ~one, ~body, ~thing, ..."

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] meet
    By Ashiuhto in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Jan-2011, 13:45
  2. [Grammar] meet versus meet with
    By Indec in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Nov-2008, 16:42
  3. meet an expression, meet a word
    By heidita in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Apr-2008, 00:32
  4. sports meet/athletic meet
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Oct-2007, 08:31

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •