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    #1

    Full form of "e.g"

    e.g means example. what is the full form of "e.g"

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    #2

    Re: Full form of "e.g"

    e.g. stands for exempli gratia (a Latin expression) and means 'for example' .

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Full form of "e.g"

    We never use the full form. We read 'e.g.' either as 'E - G' or as 'for example'.

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    #4

    Re: Full form of "e.g"

    Similarly (but rather irrelevantly), we do not read "&" as "et", even though that's what the symbol originally stood for.

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    #5

    Re: Full form of "e.g"

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Similarly (but rather irrelevantly), we do not read "&" as "et", even though that's what the symbol originally stood for.
    Not irrelevant. Interesting, too - I'd forgotten that. It has reminded me that 'et cetera' used to be abbreviated as '&c' (et c). Incidentally, the current abbreviation 'etc' is usually read as 'et cetera', often thought of as one word. When I was at school, I was taught that 'etc' should be read as 'and so on'; I don't think many people do that today.

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    #6

    Re: Full form of "e.g"

    Quote Originally Posted by fivejedjon View Post
    We never use the full form. We read 'e.g.' either as 'E - G' or as 'for example'.
    ...And if we did, we 'should' supply only one example - unless one were to say that it stood for exemplorum gratia!

    b

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    #7

    Re: Full form of "e.g"

    Sic loquimur omnes

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