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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #1

    over there

    Hi.
    "It's been raining over there non-stop"
    Can I say "It's been raining in there non-stop" or even "It's been raining there non-stop". Is there any difference?
    Thanks in advance.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: over there

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Hi.
    "It's been raining over there non-stop"
    Can I say "It's been raining in there non-stop" or even "It's been raining there non-stop". Is there any difference?
    Thanks in advance.
    You could say "It's been raining there non-stop" but not "in there".

  3. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: over there

    Ok, is there any difference between there and over there in that context?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: over there

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Ok, is there any difference between there and over there in that context?
    Not really, no.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: over there

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Ok, is there any difference between there and over there in that context?
    If you say 'there', you are probably referring to a place previously mentioned.
    If you say 'over there' you may be pointing towards it. If not, then you probably consider 'over there' to be at some distance and, perhaps, the other side of a mountain range or stretch of water.

    ps. Once again, bhaisahab beat me to it. I agree with his answer - I was simply adding a possible difference.
    Last edited by 5jj; 13-Mar-2011 at 21:36. Reason: ps added

  6. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: over there

    Thank you.
    And here is the last question can I say "Go over there and bring me something"?
    According to your reply, fivejedjon, it looks like that it would be right.
    Thank you, again.
    Last edited by AlexAD; 13-Mar-2011 at 21:43.

  7. euncu's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: over there

    ***neither a teacher nor a native-speaker***

    "In there" denotes an enclosed space.

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