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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question "treatment" for children?

    Hi all,
    Can the way a child is brought up and treated (in the way they're told by parents how to behave, how to be disciplined, how to respect others, etc.) be called treatment? Any other term used in this case, please?


    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: "treatment" for children?

    Referring back to the verb you correctly used, I would talk about a child's 'upbringing'. This means the way in which a child was brought up, which seems to be what you want.

    I wouldn't use 'treatment' in this context. We usually qualify 'upbringing' with one of a variety of adjectives such as strict, tough, relaxed or liberal, thereby covering every possibility!

  2. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "treatment" for children?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Dude View Post
    Referring back to the verb you correctly used, I would talk about a child's 'upbringing'. This means the way in which a child was brought up, which seems to be what you want.

    I wouldn't use 'treatment' in this context. We usually qualify 'upbringing' with one of a variety of adjectives such as strict, tough, relaxed or liberal, thereby covering every possibility!

    Many thanks. I used to think, or have the feeling that, bringing up a child was more of a physical process! So, can't the verb treat be used as a verb for the noun upbringing? (I'm a bit confused, so please kindly put up with my questions! )

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    #4

    Re: "treatment" for children?

    parent can be a noun and a verb.

    a child can be parented.

    parents also raise a child

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    #5

    Re: "treatment" for children?

    So, can't the verb treat be used as a verb for the noun upbringing?

    Mehrgan.
    Just to expand on The Dude's posts. Although a child can receive "harsh treatment" or "be treated indulgently" during its upbringing, "treat" in itself is not a verb for "upbringing". Better terms are "rear" or "raise": "He is raising/rearing his children with a good sense of right and wrong". "They had a good upbringing and were raised to value their family". And as Susie says, the way a child is "parented" is often synonymous with its upbringing.

    not a teacher

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "treatment" for children?

    So many thanks for all the very useful answers of yours!

  4. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #7

    Question Re: "treatment" for children?

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    So, can't the verb treat be used as a verb for the noun upbringing?

    Mehrgan.
    Just to expand on The Dude's posts. Although a child can receive "harsh treatment" or "be treated indulgently" during its upbringing, "treat" in itself is not a verb for "upbringing". Better terms are "rear" or "raise": "He is raising/rearing his children with a good sense of right and wrong". "They had a good upbringing and were raised to value their family". And as Susie says, the way a child is "parented" is often synonymous with its upbringing.

    not a teacher

    And one last question, if you don't mind it of course. If a child behaves inappropriately by, say, talking back, being disrespectful, etc. can we say they are reared/raised badly? (They've had a bad upbringing?)


    Many thanks again.

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    #8

    Re: "treatment" for children?

    And one last question, if you don't mind it of course. If a child behaves inappropriately by, say, talking back, being disrespectful, etc. can we say they are reared/raised badly? (They've had a bad upbringing?)

    They were badly/not well raised is the usual order, but what you have is OK. And raised feels more natural than reared here to me, but that might be regional.

    They've had a bad upbringing is fine.

    In reference to your comment that "upbringing" seemed like a physical process; when someone is behaving unmannerly they are sometimes jokingly asked, "Were you brought up or dragged up?". A similar remark is, "Who brung you up?", with the incorrect form suggesting uncouthness.

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