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  1. wq.denis's Avatar
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    #1

    Persuande, convince, convert to

    Hi all,


    Persuande, convince, convert to

    These words above have similar meaning and i always confuse when i need to use them.

    So I will appreciate if someone give example sentences for me.

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    #2

    Re: Persuande, convince, convert to

    Hi.

    The word is "persuade", not "persuande".

    "Persuade" and "convince" are similar in meaning. They both mean to make (someone) take a certain opinion or belief.

    When you convince somebody, you do it usually by means of logical arguments. When you persuade somebody, you can also do it with your charm or by appealing to emotions. However, I believe the distinction isn't strict.

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    #3

    Re: Persuande, convince, convert to

    And convert to is not the same at all. It means 'change to'.

    'Please convert these measurements from feet to meters.'

    'Whilst in prison I converted to Christianity.'

    Rover

  2. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Persuande, convince, convert to

    Hi,
    Also, I think when we convince somebody we make them certain about something, or make them accept the same thing we think is right, while by persuading someone we get them to do something. That is, after persuade we might expect an action.
    However, they're interchangably used in contemporary English. I hope next posters will comment on this. Thanks.

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    #5

    Re: Persuande, convince, convert to

    NOT A TEACHER.

    You persuade someone to do something.

    You convince someone that something is true.

    You also convince someone of something.

    You will often hear "convince to do something," but that's considered bad English by many people.

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    #6

    Re: Persuande, convince, convert to

    Some sentences:

    Rein and the jurors begged Ezell to go to the evidence boxes and pull evidence to try to convince them of her opinion. (Abdon M. Pallasch, The Chicago Sun-Times, 2006)


    I am strong-willed. I can convince myself of anything. (William Shaw, Harper’s Bazaar, 2001)


    Although she tried to convince me to forget the plan, she reluctantly agreed to help because of her loyalty to the doctor. (Begay, R. Cruz, American Indian Quarterly, 2004)


    Davies had to persuade her to take part in the cancer awareness activities. He asked her to do it for him. (Michelle Hiskey, Atlanta Journal Constitution, 2006)


    how much easier it is to believe that the sons of men by nature can become sons of God by grace and dwell in God; for it is in him alone and thanks to him alone that they can be happy, by sharing in his immortality; it was to persuade us of this that the Son of God came to share in our mortality (Neil Ormerod, Theological Studies, 2003)


    If we are naturalists, we may want to call this sort of commitment not prerational but irrational. To do so implies that we have ready to hand a standard by which to judge a belief in the Koran's inerrancy: the naturalist's own commitment to evidence, experiment, and scientific consensus. The difficulty is that, while we may subscribe to this standard, the fundamentalist does not. We will not persuade him of his irrationality, since he starts from different basic assumptions about how to justify belief and proceeds from there, perhaps with a high degree of consistency. (T.W. Clark, Humanist, 1992)


    Studies commissioned by frightened industry leaders show that someone who is not desensitized to killing in childhood is unlikely ever to hunt. But in this age of single-parent households, children can be recruited into sport hunting only if their mothers encourage them. And the best way to gain women's support is to persuade us that blowing away helpless animals is a form of emancipation from traditional gender stereotypes. (1999)


    However, I've heard enough to convince me that the president should be informed of this immediately. I'm going to have him join our meeting. (H G Stratmann, The Day the Music Died, 2010)


    "If the change is to be for her good, we must try to persuade her to it, however. But, judging from what she said to me this afternoon, I fear it will be a difficult matter."

    "But, papa, why should we seek to persuade her against her own judgment."

    "My dear, we don't need to persuade her against her judgment, but against her affection for us. She only fears that we will miss her sadly, and she is not quite sure whether she ought to go and leave us."
    (Margaret M. Robertson (Margaret Murray), Janet's Love and Service, 1869)

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    #7

    Re: Persuande, convince, convert to

    Sentences in which "convert" has a meaning similar to that of "convince" or "persuade" (it not always does).

    He led a happy life among the miners, making various experiments in alchymy while deep in the bowels of the earth. He acquired a great knowledge of metals, and gradually got rid of his extravagant notions about the philosopher's stone. The miners had no faith in alchymy; and they converted him to their way of thinking, not only in that but in other respects. From their legends, he became firmly convinced that the bowels of the earth were inhabited by good and evil spirits, and that firedamp and other explosions sprang from no other causes than the mischievous propensities of the latter. (Charles Mackay, Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions -- Volume 3, 1869)


    If I am sincere in the profession of the Catholic doctrine, can you be so simple as to expect to convert me to your opinions without the advantage of any other revelation, than I have myself, by the superiority of your intellectual powers alone? (Benjamin Lynde Oliver, The rights of an American citizen; with a commentary on State rights, and on the Constitution and policy of the United States, 1832)


    After all, sir, though, where judgments differ, one only can be right, yet each person must be permitted to follow his own. You would hardly, I imagine, allow your sister to prescribe to you in your marriage choice, and I fear she will lay claim to the same independence for herself. If you can convert her to your way of thinking, it is well. (Charles Brockden Brown, The Novels, 1827)

    Being then imbued with that economical creed which is taught in our public seminaries, I had occasion to attempt its vindication, against the aggressions then supposed to be made on commerce by the useful arts, through protective legislation; and I had the good fortune or misfortune, on investigating the subject anew, to convert myself to the opinions I had undertaken to combat. (Phillips on Protection and Free Trade, 1851)


    Reggio Emilia sees nothing wrong with marketing three kinds of balsamic vinegar -- a practice that keeps the prices of the two younger vinegars far below that of traditional Modena vinegar. I was going to the source of the vinegar that converted me to the profligate American use of balsamic vinegar -- Cavalli, where Roberto and Giovanni Cavalli, sons of the founder (the business is parvenu by local standards), make both traditional and condiment-quality vinegar. (Atlantic Monthly, 1994)


    Note that "persuade of" is quite uncommon and so is using "convert to" as in the next to last quotation.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 16-Mar-2011 at 14:29.

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