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    #11

    Lightbulb Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Yesterday is the subject, not the object.
    It's an interesting thing with constructions of that kind.
    Yesterday (subject) was Tuesday (subject complement).
    but
    Tuesday (subject) was yesterday (time adverbial, not a subject complement).

    It's such a baffling thing.

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    #12

    Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    But why not call what happens in "there" sentences inversion too? Saying that those sentences have two subjects seems unnecessary to me.
    It has to do with semantics, meaning. (It is) the notional subject (that) carries the meaning.

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    #13

    Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    It's an interesting thing with constructions of that kind.
    Yesterday (subject) was Tuesday (subject complement).
    but
    Tuesday (subject) was yesterday (time adverbial, not a subject complement).

    It's such a baffling thing.
    Yesterday is a noun and it can function as an adverb of time where it answers the question When?:

    Q: When was Tuesday?
    A: Yesterday was Tuesday. Subject (noun)
    A: Tuesday was yesterday. Adverb of Time


    Subject complements are nouns and adjectives:


    • Tuesday was hot. Adjective
    • Tuesday was a good day. Noun phrase

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    #14

    Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    No one to my knowledge has ever said 'English is a strictly SVO language', aside from you, that is. (You may want to choose your words more carefully when reporting what you have read not to mention take a little more time reading what has actually been said. )
    I read what was said very carefully. I may just be too obtuse to get it. Please excuse me if that is so. I also hope I didn't sound offensive, which, I surmise, could happen (even though it hasn't been explicitly said).

    Nobody said English was stricly SVO. What was said is that "there" is the subject in

    There is a glass on the table.

    and that we know that because English is an SV language.

    It was also said that "yesterday" is the subject in

    Yesterday was Tuesday.

    and it was said that "Tuesday"'s being a subject would contradict the fact that English has the SV word order.

    I understand that you made use of the following implication:

    English is an SV language. => In those particular senteces, the subject comes first.

    Clearly, the consequent is what your statement was. The antecedent is the only hypothesis I could find in your posts.

    How does the antecedent imply the consequent? What does it mean that English uses the SV wird order?

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    #15

    Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    There remains an option with prop it, similar to existential there:

    It was Tuesday yesterday.


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    #16

    Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    ...it was said that "Tuesday"'s being a subject would contradict the fact that English has the SV word order.
    Confuses the issue, not contradicts it. Tuesday is not the subject here:


    • Yesterday was Tuesday.


    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    I understand that you made use of the following implication:

    English is an SV language. => In those particular senteces, the subject comes first.

    Clearly, the consequent is what your statement was. The antecedent was the only hypothesis I could find in your posts.Clearly, the consequent is what your statement was. The antecedent was the only hypothesis I could find in your posts.
    I cannot make sense of what it is you are trying to say, and the pitiful part is that I actually want to know what you said.

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    What does it mean that English uses the SV wird order?
    In what context? The question is broad.

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    #17

    Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    There remains an option with prop it, similar to existential there:

    It was Tuesday yesterday.

    It doesn't 'remain'. It is clearly a semantically empty subject in that sentence.

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    #18

    Lightbulb Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    It doesn't 'remain'. It is clearly a semantically empty subject in that sentence.
    It does, when you think the way I intended others to understand my words - apart from saying Yesterday was Tuesday and Tuesday was yesterday, you can also say It was Tuesday yesterday.

    I didn't mean what you seem to have thought.

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    #19

    Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    ..., you can also say It was Tuesday yesterday.
    Yes, you can. Was that of issue?

    Expletive it can be replaced by the notional subject, as in your example above (It = Tuesday, not yesterday), but it's not an expletive here:


    • It was Tuesday.
    • Tuesday was.
    • When I last saw you was Tuesday.


    It is here:

    • It was Tuesday yesterday.
    • Tuesday was yesterday

    Not here:

    • It was yesterday, on Tuesday.
    • When I last saw you was yesterday, on Tuesday.
    • Yesterday was on Tuesday.

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    #20

    Thumbs up Re: object/subject in 'there+be' sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Yes, you can. Was that of issue?
    Yep.

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