Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    As and like

    Murphy's book says

    ----------
    As can also be a preposition (which means you can use it with a noun), but the meaning is different from like. We use like when we compare things:

    She looks beautiful Ė like a princess. (she isnít really a princess)

    -----------

    Is it always true? I have come across this sentence


    She loved the costume and acted as a princess before we headed out for the night.

    I think that she wasn't a real princess so there must be used "acted like a princess". What do you think about it?

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: As and like

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    Murphy's book says

    ----------
    As can also be a preposition (which means you can use it with a noun), but the meaning is different from like. We use like when we compare things:

    She looks beautiful Ė like a princess. (she isnít really a princess)
    In other words, like before a noun, as before a clause:

    [1] She looks (just) like a princess (but she is not). noun
    [2] She looks as (if she really is) a princess. clause



    • She loved the costume and acted as (if she really was) a princess before we headed out for the night.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: As and like

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    In other words, like before a noun, as before a clause:

    [1] She looks (just) like a princess (but she is not). noun
    [2] She looks as (if she really is) a princess. clause



    • She loved the costume and acted as (if she really was) a princess before we headed out for the night.
    Thank you. Still I am not sure if it answers my question.

    1) I don't see where you see a clause in

    She looks as (if she really is) a princess. clause

    if you mean - as if she really is - is a cluase, then why can't we make the same clause in the first sentence

    She looks like she is a princess.

    So, I don't see a good reason to connect the usage of as with a cluase

    2) The second problem is that both of your examples mean the same while it shoudn't be like that in accordance with Murphy's explanation.

    He gives such examples.

    A few years ago I worked as a bus driver. (He really was a bus driver)

    How did we get as if meaning in the second sentence ([2] She looks as ) if as shows facts not counterfactualness?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: As and like

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post

    [1] She looks (just) like a princess (but she is not). noun
    [2] She looks as (if she really is) a princess. clause
    Both mean the same here - she is not a princess in your opinion. This is what gives me a hard time. I thought the second one should mean she looks as a princess and she is a princess.

  2. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 2,958
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: As and like

    To me, She looks as a princess means She is dressed to look like a princess, which she may not be.

  3. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: As and like

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    1) I don't see where you see a clause in

    She looks as (if she really is) a princess. clause
    A clause has a subject (she) and a verb (is).

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    if you mean - as if she really is - is a clause, then why can't we make the same clause in the first sentence

    She looks like she is a princess.
    Oh, speakers do in fact say that (they get like and as confused). The rule is as with a clause, like with a noun.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    2) The second problem is that both of your examples mean the same while it shoudn't be like that in accordance with Murphy's explanation.

    He gives such examples.

    A few years ago I worked as a bus driver. (He really was a bus driver)

    How did we get as if meaning in the second sentence ([2] She looks as ) if as shows facts not counterfactualness?
    She acted as a princess, meaning she believed she really was a princess and so she was.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: As and like

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    To me, She looks as a princess means She is dressed to look like a princess, which she may not be.
    This is what made me start this thread as I see many think so.

    It turns out that

    She looks as a princess.
    She looks like a princess

    Mean the same. I find it difficult to accept so far. Plus, Murphy says this

    D.As can also be a preposition (which means you can use it with a noun), but the meaning is different from like.

    We use like when we compare things:
    ■ She looks beautiful Ė like a princess, (she isnít really a princess)
    ■ Everyone is sick at home. Our house is like a hospital, (it isnít really a hospital)

    We use as + noun to say what something really is or was (especially when we talk about someoneís job or how we use something):

    ■ A few years ago I worked as a waiter. (I really was a waiter)
    ■ Sue has just found a job as a sales clerk.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: As and like

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    A clause has a subject (she) and a verb (is).

    Oh, speakers do in fact say that (they get like and as confused). The rule is as with a clause, like with a noun.

    She acted as a princess, meaning she believed she really was a princess and so she was.
    I am not a teacher I am learning things. All I can say is based on books and my personal analysis. As for this rule you mentioned.

    The rule is as with a clause, like with a noun.

    That's right. This case is also mentioned by Murphy. However, it doesn't preclude another case where as can be used with a very noun by itself without a cluase.

    A few yesr ago I worked as a bus driver. (There is no clause here after as)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: As and like

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    She acted as a princess, meaning she believed she really was a princess and so she was.
    This one is also not so clear.

    To be a princess and to think/believe that you are a princess are not the same.

  4. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 2,958
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: As and like

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    This is what made me start this thread as I see many think so.

    It turns out that

    She looks as a princess.
    She looks like a princess

    Mean the same.
    No, they don't. Otherwise, you wouldn't be asking the question, would you?
    What we have to be aware of when trying to understand the usage of as and like is that they are context dependent, that is they function differently in different patterns and they play different roles in different situations. It's also about the verbs with which they are used. It's quite a complex issue, to be honest.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •