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  1. eddy143's Avatar
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    #1

    Post what is the clause in the sentence?

    hi there, i'm please with the way people do ask and answer questions in this forum. More ink to yoour pens and more great thoughts to your memories.
    well, i have a piece of question here:
    (1) the boy who is reading a book is Tony. (reading a book).
    what is the clause in this sentence and what clause might that be?
    thanks.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: what is the clause in the sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by eddy143 View Post
    hi there, i'm please with the way people do ask and answer questions in this forum. More ink to yoour pens and more great thoughts to your memories.
    well, i have a piece of question here:
    (1) the boy who is reading a book is Tony. (reading a book).
    what is the clause in this sentence and what clause might that be?
    thanks.
    A clause has a subject and a verb:


    • The boy who is reading a book is Tony.


    Clauses introduced by who are called relative clauses. Relative clauses are dependent clauses: they cannot stand on their own (That is, if you said as a statement, not a as question, "...who is reading a book", it wouldn't make much sense. It needs more information.)

    Relative clauses act as modifiers: they tell us more about the noun they modify. In your example, the relative clause who is reading a book tells us more about the noun boy.

    Relative clauses can be restrictive or non-restrictive. Here's an example:


    • A suitcase that has no handles is useless.
    • A suitcase, that has no handles, is useless.


    The second sentence above means, a suitcase is useless. Obviously, that's not true. A suitcase is useful. The correct relative clause is restrictive, so no commas:


    • A suitcase that has no handles is useless.


    With your example, you can change the meaning of the sentence by adding commas (make the clause non-restrictive) if you wanted it to mean "by the way" (added information that's not essential to the meaning of the sentence):


    • The boy, who (by the way) is reading a book, is Tony.


    Your original sentence has a restrictive relative clause:


    • The boy who is reading a book is Tony.


    Relative clauses are often reduced, like this:


    • The boy reading the book is Tony.
    • Tony is the boy reading the book.


    The phrase reading a book is a reduced relative clause.

  3. eddy143's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: what is the clause in the sentence?

    what a hot soup i have here! You are my genius! thanks a million. Is well understood.

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