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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 668
    #1

    Full of hot air

    Hi, there.
    I've found out from the idiom dictionary on the site that's
    Someone who is full of hot air talks a lot of rubbish.
    And that sounds a little bit offensive, isn't it?
    Along with that definition I've found another one which comes from the Lingvo dictionary:
    It's some way to say that you're not right and that sounds more amicable.
    Could you please comment on these points and could you please give me an advice to use or not to use the idiom.

    I would be grateful to you teachers if you highlight my mistakes in this thread.

    Thanks for your reply.

  2. probus's Avatar
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      • Canada
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      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 3,458
    #2

    Re: Full of hot air

    To say that someone is full of hot air is definitely insulting. You should not use it unless you wish to insult the person. On the other hand, I use the expression frequently about politicians, but only when they are not present to hear it.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,330
    #3

    Re: Full of hot air

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Hi, there.
    I've found out from the idiom dictionary on the site that's
    Someone who is full of hot air talks a lot of rubbish.
    And that sounds a little bit offensive, isn't it?
    Along with that definition I've found another one which comes from the Lingvo dictionary:
    It's some way to say that you're not right and that sounds more amicable.
    Could you please comment on these points and could you please give me an advice to use or not to use the idiom.

    I would be grateful to you teachers if you highlight my mistakes in this thread.

    Thanks for your reply.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Alex,


    (1) Here in the United States, thanks to cable we have hundreds of

    television channels from which to choose!!! Of course, those channels

    need programs to fill the time. The news and discussion programs

    really need people to talk, talk, and talk about the latest national

    and international news. They are referred to as "talking heads."

    That is, four or five people sit around a table, and we see their

    heads and their mouths. Some people feel that many of those

    talking heads (many of whom claim to be "experts," although they

    may be full of hot air) are nothing but windbags (bags full of wind).

    (2) You asked that your mistakes be pointed out. So may I

    respectfully suggest that the "correct" tag question is:

    And that sounds a little bit offensive, doesn't it?

    (BUT: And that is a little bit offensive, isn't it?)

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