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    #1

    superverb

    Hi, every1

    Those multi-meaning verbs like get, go, give, take, makeÖ with all those dozens of meanings. Here is a proposition of a bond definition for them, itís a superverb. This definition is supposed to help non English speaking students to gather the multi-meaning verbs into a group.

    Any ideas? How much do you hate this superstuff? Thanks

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    #2

    Re: superverb

    I don't hate them at all, personally. Do you? What kind of ideas are you looking for?

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    #3

    Re: superverb

    The reason for this definition is to release the multiple of linguistic meanings part of English language verbs to non English speaking students. The superverb definition itself would help non English speaking students to unlock their minds and expand boundaries of their native language associated with a particular verb of their language.

    The superverb definition would help non English students to override the auxiliary verb definition in order to avoid semantic complexity and syntactic ambiguity.
    Last edited by alex spb; 24-Mar-2011 at 15:01.

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    #4

    Re: superverb

    Quote Originally Posted by alex spb View Post
    Hi, every1

    Those multi-meaning verbs like get, go, give, take, makeÖ with all those dozens of meanings. Here is a proposition of a bond definition for them, itís a superverb. This definition is supposed to help non English speaking students to gather the multi-meaning verbs into a group.

    Any ideas? How much do you hate this superstuff? Thanks

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) A very interesting idea.

    (2) I know that some teachers tell their students that a semicolon (;)

    is really just a super comma.

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    #5

    Re: superverb

    I know that some teachers tell their students that a semicolon (;)

    is really just a super comma.
    They should know better - it isn't.

    Rover

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    #6

    Re: superverb

    Quote Originally Posted by alex spb View Post
    The superverb definition would help non English students to override the auxiliary verb definition in order to avoid semantic complexity and syntactic ambiguity.
    What's the difference between superverb and (main) verb? Would you only use superverb for words that have a certain number of phrasal verbs? One problem, regardless of the merit of a term, is practicality- we already have phrasal verb/multi-word verb, and two-word verb or two- or three-word verbs, though these tend to be used less. Do we say continuous/progressive/durative, auxiliary/helping or copula/copular/linking etc? There's already so much jargon and competing or overlapping terminology as it is, that new terms may actually add to the confusion they intend to clear up.

    BTW, we have 66 phrasal verbs in our list with get and there are undoubtedly plenty we have missed- finding a single definition that encompasses that lot will not be easy.

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    #7

    Re: superverb

    Tdol. Same here. I like the stuff am used to. As about practicality in terminology and the confusion that new terminology obviously create, again you are absolutely right.

    But unfortunately, non English speaking newbies do not like regular terminology and they fear-some the immense layers of information they are up to comprehend through their everyday hard studies. Hitting that Great Wall of Grammar, deep in their hearts people tend to call regular terminology obsoletes. Sort of a fight back reaction, troubled students sometimes like to generate. Thatís what i know from my practice.

    A new terminology sometimes help creating a unique study approach (hey, we do this our own way and we are the first to explore the stuff, etc). Little mama-helpers like that do really help on the physiological side of the things and may really encourage newbies. This is a way the new terminology come into existence i guess. And when we create it then we obviously care about © of it sort of. Why not?

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    #8

    Re: superverb

    Personally I do not think that ," The superverb definition itself would help non English speaking students to unlock their minds and expand boundaries of their native language associated with a particular verb of their language." However, If you find the 'superverb' idea works with your students, then stick with it.

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