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    #1

    almost totally

    Would it make sense if I said "Dry Tortugas National Park is almost totally underwater"?

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    #2

    Re: almost totally

    With a space: under_water.

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    #3

    Re: almost totally

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    With a space: under_water.
    My Webster says it can be also underwater without a space.

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    #4

    Re: almost totally

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    My Webster says it can be also underwater without a space.
    Your dictionary says underwater is an adjective - (an underwater grotto).

    Here, under water is an adverbial phrase.

    BC is right.

    Rover

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    #5

    Re: almost totally

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Your dictionary says underwater is an adjective - (an underwater grotto).

    Here, under water is an adverbial phrase.

    BC is right.

    Rover
    "Meaning:
    : located, used, done, or happening below the surface of water ▪ underwater caves/volcanoes ▪ underwater photography ▪ an underwater camera
    —underwater adverb ▪ swimming underwater"

    It says also underwater-adverb

    "un‧der‧wa‧ter [only before noun]
    below the surface of an area of water, or able to be used there:
    an underwater camera
    —underwater adverb:
    He dived underwater and swam away."

    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/underwater
    Last edited by ostap77; 25-Mar-2011 at 14:43.

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    #6

    Re: almost totally

    Merriam-Webster online appears to be your first source and it does include the phrase "underwater - adverb." But no example of adverbial usage is provided. The link just takes me back to the adjectival definition.

    The citation for your example "He dived underwater and swam away" appears to be Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English online.

    Okay so says Longman, but I have never heard underwater used as an adverb in my life, nor can I find an adverbial use in a quick search of the British National Corpus.

    Don't use "underwater" as an adverb. Use "under water".

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    #7

    Re: almost totally

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    Merriam-Webster online appears to be your first source and it does include the phrase "underwater - adverb." But no example of adverbial usage is provided. The link just takes me back to the adjectival definition.

    The citation for your example "He dived underwater and swam away" appears to be Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English online.

    Okay so says Longman, but I have never heard underwater used as an adverb in my life, nor can I find an adverbial use in a quick search of the British National Corpus.

    Don't use "underwater" as an adverb. Use "under water".
    underwater
    adjective
    adverb
    /ˌʌn.dəˈwɔː.tər/
    /-dɚˈwɑː.t ̬ɚ/

    "under the surface of the water, especially under the surface of the sea
    an underwater camera (= a camera that you can use under water)
    Some species of turtle can remain underwater for 24 hours."

    Definition of underwater adjective/adverb from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus

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    #8

    Re: almost totally

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    underwater
    adjective
    adverb
    /ˌʌn.dəˈwɔː.tər/
    /-dɚˈwɑː.t ̬ɚ/

    "under the surface of the water, especially under the surface of the sea
    an underwater camera (= a camera that you can use under water)
    Some species of turtle can remain underwater for 24 hours."

    Definition of underwater adjective/adverb from Cambridge Dictionary Online: Free English Dictionary and Thesaurus
    There is also a difference in pronunciation:

    under water vs underwater

    If I heard "under water for 24 hours" I'd know exactly what the speaker meant and consider it a fluent utterance. If saw in writing "underwater for 24 hours" I'd consider that a spelling mistake. If I heard "underwater for 24 hours" I'd assume the speaker was a person with a foreign accent.

    Anyway, suit yourself. We've told you what we think.

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