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    #1

    Question Doing so

    Hi,
    I have a question about the use of "so."

    Sentence Correction:
    Parliament did not accord full refugee benefits to twelve of the recent immigrants because it believed that to do it rewards them for entering the country illegally.
    A)to do it rewards
    B)doing it rewards
    C)to do this would reward
    D)doing so would reward
    E)to do it would reward

    Although I picked choice D in the practice test and it's the OA. I just played it by ears. I would like to know why it's better to use "so" as adverb in this sentence.
    Please advise.
    Thanks.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: Doing so

    In that context 'so' functions more like a pronoun:

    Parliament did not accord full refugee benefits . . . because it believed that doing so (i.e., granting that status) would reward them for entering the country illegally.

    Correction: I just played it by ear.


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    #3

    Re: Doing so

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    In that context 'so' functions more like a pronoun:

    Parliament did not accord full refugee benefits . . . because it believed that doing so (i.e., granting that status) would reward them for entering the country illegally.

    Correction: I just played it by ear.
    I'm confused...The book explained that "Choice D, the best answer, appropriately uses the adverb so to refer back to the verb accord."

    Personally, I don't know if "so" is used as "adverb" or "pronoun" in this sentence. Choice D just sounds right to me.

    Can you shed me some light on when to use "so" and "it" as adverb/pronoun?
    Thanks.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: Doing so

    Every word has a form - what it looks like - and a function - what it does. The word 'so' generally functions as an adverb, but it can have other functions. In the example below, 'so' refers back to 'loyal to her friends' which makes it pronominal in function.

    She was loyal to her friends and she remained loyal to her friends.
    She was loyal to her friends and she remained so.
    She was loyal to her friends and she remained that way.

    'so' functions as a nominal but it still expresses an adverbial meaning. Compare:

    [1] She was loyal to her friends and she remained it. (awkward)
    [2] She was loyal to her friends and she remained so. (i.e., that way)

    The first example is awkward with 'it' because 'it' refers back to an adjective phrase: loyal to her friends. Pronouns refer back to nouns, right? Never adjectives.

    The second example is grammatical because 'so', an adverb, refers back to an adjective phrase. Note, adverbs modify verbs and adjectives.

    'so', an adverb by nature, modifies adjectives. That's something the pronoun 'it' cannot do.

    In short,

    doing it: 'it' is a nominal, so it must refer back to a nominal
    doing so: 'so' is an adverb. It works with verb(al)s and adjectives.

    That's the difference, and that's the reason D is the correct choice.


    • Join Date: Aug 2004
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    #5

    Re: Doing so

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Every word has a form - what it looks like - and a function - what it does. The word 'so' generally functions as an adverb, but it can have other functions. In the example below, 'so' refers back to 'loyal to her friends' which makes it pronominal in function.

    She was loyal to her friends and she remained loyal to her friends.
    She was loyal to her friends and she remained so.
    She was loyal to her friends and she remained that way.

    'so' functions as a nominal but it still expresses an adverbial meaning. Compare:

    [1] She was loyal to her friends and she remained it. (awkward)
    [2] She was loyal to her friends and she remained so. (i.e., that way)

    The first example is awkward with 'it' because 'it' refers back to an adjective phrase: loyal to her friends. Pronouns refer back to nouns, right? Never adjectives.

    The second example is grammatical because 'so', an adverb, refers back to an adjective phrase. Note, adverbs modify verbs and adjectives.

    'so', an adverb by nature, modifies adjectives. That's something the pronoun 'it' cannot do.

    In short,

    doing it: 'it' is a nominal, so it must refer back to a nominal
    doing so: 'so' is an adverb. It works with verb(al)s and adjectives.

    That's the difference, and that's the reason D is the correct choice.
    Gotcha!
    Thanks so much!!!

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: Doing so

    You're most welcome, piggy386.

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