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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question "Pączki " in English

    Hi,

    Could anyone please tell me the right equivalent for this Polish word (Pączki )? (especially the ones with cream inside)


    How is this pronounced in English?


    Many thanks.

  2. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Pączki " in English

    Berliner.

    There's a ... myth? legend? .... about Berliners and JFK:

    I'm a jelly doughnut.

  3. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #3

    2

    The ones with cream inside are called "Boston cream (doughnuts)".

    All this is for AmE of course.

  4. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Pączki " in English

    Is it spelt Paczki? And pronounced /pʊntʃkɪ/?


    Ta!

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    #5

    Re: "Pączki " in English

    Mehrgan.
    I Googled "Pączki images" and found a lot of delicious looking things that seem to be what I would call jam doughnuts with icing on top (sometimes with nuts or glac fruit) – and I would like one right now.

    I went back for another look and found a link to this, which might be helpful:
    "Pączki (Polish: pączki) are traditional Polish doughnuts. Pączki is the plural form of the word pączek in Polish, but many English speakers use paczki as singular and paczkis as plural. A pączek is a deep-fried piece of dough shaped into a flattened sphere and filled with Plums or other sweet filling. A traditional filling is marmalade made from fried rose buds. Fresh paczki are usually covered with powdered sugar, icing or bits of fried orange zest."
    It also says they are sometimes called Bismarcks in the US.

    www.hamtramck.us/events/pages/paczki.php

    not a teacher
    Last edited by JMurray; 04-Apr-2011 at 02:51. Reason: second bite

  5. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "Pączki " in English

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    Mehrgan.
    I Googled "Pączki images" and found a lot of delicious looking things that seem to be what I would call jam doughnuts with icing on top (sometimes with nuts or glac fruit) and I would like one right now.

    I went back for another look and found a link to this, which might be helpful:
    "Pączki (Polish: pączki) are traditional Polish doughnuts. Pączki is the plural form of the word pączek in Polish, but many English speakers use paczki as singular and paczkis as plural. A pączek is a deep-fried piece of dough shaped into a flattened sphere and filled with Plums or other sweet filling. A traditional filling is marmalade made from fried rose buds. Fresh paczki are usually covered with powdered sugar, icing or bits of fried orange zest."
    It also says they are sometimes called Bismarcks in the US.

    www.hamtramck.us/events/pages/paczki.php

    not a teacher
    Interesting. Although I lived the first sixty years of my life in New York City, I never heard of a pacski or a Bismarck. I'd call this a jelly doughnut.

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    #7

    Re: "Pączki " in English

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi,

    Could anyone please tell me the right equivalent for this Polish word (Pączki )? (especially the ones with cream inside)


    How is this pronounced in English?


    Many thanks.
    Hi, Mehrgan.

    Polish restaurants and other places where you have both pączki and English menus tend to call pączki "donuts" or "doughnuts", which is correct, because that's what they are. Some choose to leave the Polish word, spelled "pączki" with the ogonek or "paczki" without it. This is also what they are, but then why call it translation?

    Cream is not the most common filling in Polish doughnuts, but it does happen.

    PS: I just thought you could find it interesting that doughnuts are extremely popular in Poland. The last Thursday before Lent, called Fat Thursday, has evolved into a doughnut-eating day, with people consuming dozens of them.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 04-Apr-2011 at 23:33.

  6. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "Pączki " in English

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Fat Thursday, has evolved into a doughnut-eating day, with people consuming dozens of them.
    Do you mean competitions? We have paczki eating competitions* here. Do you have something similar?

    *warning: might make you lose your appetite

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    #9

    Re: "Pączki " in English

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    Do you mean competitions? We have paczki eating competitions* here. Do you have something similar?

    *warning: might make you lose your appetite
    There are competitions too I guess, but I have never seen one. We just eat lots of doughnuts then. However, even though I haven't seen a competition with judges, contestants with numbers and so on, I consider the whole day a bit of a countrywide competition. It's never brag-free.

    PS: Mehrgan, as for English pronunciation, English Wikipedia has it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C4%85czki

    PPS: We're experiencing increases in food prices here and before last Fat Thursday (a month ago) there was a lot of concern about the price of doughnuts. Flour had just gotten more expensive and we were really afraid that we would have to eat less doughnuts that Fat Thursday. Then our good bakers promised to use only their stored flour, bought before the price increase. A sigh of relief was heard throughout the country.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 05-Apr-2011 at 10:42.

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