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    #1

    online dictionaries having more examples

    Are there any other online dictionaries with pronounciation having more examples of the search words. Onelook and Cambridge are having very less examples to ease the understanding of the meanings and usages.

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: online dictionaries having more examples

    Try corpus sites for examples:
    British National Corpus (BYU-BNC)
    Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA)

    You can continue to use dictionaries for definitions and pronunciation, but corpora provide thousands of examples of real usage.

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    #3

    Re: online dictionaries having more examples

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Try corpus sites for examples:
    British National Corpus (BYU-BNC)
    Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA)

    You can continue to use dictionaries for definitions and pronunciation, but corpora provide thousands of examples of real usage.
    Thank you for your valuable information. But I am totally in a loss once getting in the home page of your suggested website.

    1. Shall I sign up as a member first? But there are some column that it's not applicable to me, like name of university, http,.....?

    2. As I simply print the search word in the box on the left hand side of the screen, it doesn't show anything.

    3. you said, "You can continue to use dictionaries for definitions and pronunciation". Does it mean there is no definitions & pronunciation in Corpus?

    Can you help?

    ju

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    #4

    Re: online dictionaries having more examples

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    Thank you for your valuable information. But I am totally in a loss once getting in the home page of your suggested website.

    1. Shall I sign up as a member first? But there are some column that it's not applicable to me, like name of university, http,.....?

    2. As I simply print the search word in the box on the left hand side of the screen, it doesn't show anything.

    3. you said, "You can continue to use dictionaries for definitions and pronunciation". Does it mean there is no definitions & pronunciation in Corpus?

    Can you help?

    ju
    Corpus is Latin meaning "body" and a corpus is a very large body of text. A corpus won't provide pronunciations, but it is a great way to find hundreds of example sentences of words. I recommend this version of the British National Corpus because it's simpler. Just type a word into the "Look up:" box and you will see 50 random examples of that word used in real life. For example, possibility and opportunity are very similar in the dictionary but if you compare example sentences from a corpus you will start to see that they are used a little differently. A corpus is also a good place to find what prepositions are used with certain verbs, nouns or adjectives (do we say responsible of/for/with something?)*.

    For pronunciation you can try the Macmillan dictionary or How J Say.

    *responsible for something

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    #5

    Re: online dictionaries having more examples

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Ben View Post
    Corpus is Latin meaning "body" and a corpus is a very large body of text. A corpus won't provide pronunciations, but it is a great way to find hundreds of example sentences of words. I recommend this version of the British National Corpus because it's simpler. Just type a word into the "Look up:" box and you will see 50 random examples of that word used in real life. For example, possibility and opportunity are very similar in the dictionary but if you compare example sentences from a corpus you will start to see that they are used a little differently. A corpus is also a good place to find what prepositions are used with certain verbs, nouns or adjectives (do we say responsible of/for/with something?)*.

    For pronunciation you can try the Macmillan dictionary or How J Say.

    *responsible for something
    Thank you for your reply.

    How about the dictionaries show the defination, pronounciation, examples all together?

    ju

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    #6

    Re: online dictionaries having more examples

    Dictionaries have limited space for examples. The OED has lots, but it fills a shelf. Most just give one or two.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: online dictionaries having more examples

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    Are there any other online dictionaries with pronounciation having more examples of the search words. Onelook and Cambridge are having very less examples to ease the understanding of the meanings and usages.

    Thank you.
    Dictionary.com | Free Online Dictionary for English Definitions
    Dictionary and Thesaurus - Merriam-Webster Online

    I'm not sure whether these have more or less of what you're after, but you can check them out.

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    #8

    Re: online dictionaries having more examples

    For most words onelook.com has links to many dictionaries; each of these dictionaries will have different examples.

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