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    #1

    Smile why"this is she" instead of "this is her"

    when the person picking up the phone is just the one wanted on the phone, he /she may say:"this is he/she". But the sentence seems a bit strange at sencond glance. Why not "this is him/her"? Thank you for any help.

  1. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: why"this is she" instead of "this is her"

    Quote Originally Posted by marymay12 View Post
    when the person picking up the phone is just the one wanted on the phone, he /she may say:"this is he/she". But the sentence seems a bit strange at sencond glance. Why not "this is him/her"? Thank you for any help.
    You can read the answer here.

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    #3

    Re: why"this is she" instead of "this is her"

    That link does indeed provide an answer.

    Usually I give my name when I answer the phone, which means this situation does not arise. If for some reason I do not, then this happens:

    Caller: "fivejedjon?".......Response: "Yes(?)"

    Caller: "May/can I speak to fivejedjon, please?"...... Response: "Speaking."

    To me, both 'this is he' and 'this is him' sound pompous.
    Last edited by 5jj; 08-Apr-2011 at 09:21.

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    #4

    Re: why"this is she" instead of "this is her"

    Not a teacher.
    I'm just wondering if the subjective case(pronoun) has anything to do with this?
    My reason for this is:
    The word "this" is a pronoun, and he/him acts as a subject complement on "this" therefor we use she/he because it falls under the pronoun subjective case category.

    EDIT:
    Sorry, I didn't read the above link carefully. I just noticed that the above link alludes to the same conclusion as the one that I reached.
    Last edited by kazewolf; 08-Apr-2011 at 22:55.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: why"this is she" instead of "this is her"

    Quote Originally Posted by kazewolf View Post
    ... I just noticed that the above link alludes to the same conclusion as me.
    ...'the same conclusion as [the one that] I [reached]'. But it's easier to leave the pronoun out, and just say '...the same conclusion', (and leave teachers to quibble about cases!)

    b

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    #6

    Re: why"this is she" instead of "this is her"

    Quote Originally Posted by marymay12 View Post
    when the person picking up the phone is just the one wanted on the phone, he /she may say:"this is he/she". But the sentence seems a bit strange at sencond glance. Why not "this is him/her"? Thank you for any help.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) As the distinguished teachers have already told you, there is a lot

    of controversy regarding this matter.

    (2) NEVERTHELESS, there are a few people who are interested in

    upholding the highest standards of English grammar.


    (3) Since you teach English, you know, of course, that traditionally,

    one uses the nominative case after a linking verb. So in choice

    English, one says "This is she/he."

    (4) It is true, of course, that nowadays most people say "This is her/him."

    (5) You will have to make a decision -- insist on choice English

    or go along with what is now popular.

    P.S. In some cases, it's a matter of social survival. If a big, tough

    American football player said "This is he," probably some people would

    accuse him of being a "sissy" or even a person who prefers romantic

    attachments with his own gender. In other words, for some people it

    takes moral courage to speak "correct" English!!!

    (6) As a teacher, you -- of course -- wish to give your students the

    best education possible. I sincerely feel that when your students

    write English in international correspondence, they will receive more

    respect if they use choice -- rather than popular -- English.

  4. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: why"this is she" instead of "this is her"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post

    P.S. In some cases, it's a matter of social survival. If a big, tough

    American football player said "This is he," probably some people would

    accuse him of being a "sissy" or even a person who prefers romantic

    attachments with his own gender
    . In other words, for some people it

    takes moral courage to speak "correct" English!!!
    ???????*


    *speechless

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: why"this is she" instead of "this is her"

    I use "This is she" when the caller has mispronounced my name, a clear signal that it's a soliciatation call. Usually, like 5jj, I say "Speaking" or "This is Barb." I would never, ever say "This is her."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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