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    #1

    Find the mistake

    Hello,

    Can you please tell me where you find the mistake in this sentence:

    "I will go out at the weekend, but I am not very sure"

    Thank you for your help

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Find the mistake

    Quote Originally Posted by ratóncolorao View Post
    Hello,

    Can you please tell me where you find the mistake in this sentence:

    "I will go out at the weekend, but I am not very sure"

    Thank you for your help
    If you are not very sure that you will go out, you can't say "I will go out". Either you will go out or, if you are not very sure, you might go out.

  2. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Find the mistake

    Is "at the weekend" British? It sounds strange to me.

    I would say "on the weekend".

  3. nyota's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Find the mistake

    Yep, it is:

    at the weekend British English
    on the weekend American English

    I never work at the weekend.
    What are you doing on the weekend?


    Longman - weekend

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Find the mistake

    An interesting point about this. AmE is far more conservative than BrE, and we have retained the Teutonic tendency to roll numerous smaller nouns into larger ones -- even more so than BrE.

    This is revealed by intonation. Both "weekend" and "new year" are stressed the same as "bookcase" or "balljoint" in AmE.

    In BrE, the first two are intoned rather more like separate words should be: week END, new YEAR.

    (You will remember that the Anglo-Saxon tradition still alive in English is generally to pronounce multi-syllabic nouns with the stress on the first syllable.)

    Perhaps we should, in AmE, start writing "newyear" as one word, as it is (I believe) in most Germanic languages.

    So, "at the week END" is intoned in BrE rather the same way we would in AmE if we used the much much less frequent, but still plausible, construction: "at the week's end."

    This should explain the difference in usage between at and on: we say, on Saturday, and on Sunday, so if the weekend is uttered as a Teutonic compound noun, fusing the two days into one concept, on the weekend is very natural.

    If, on the other hand, you think of it as "the week END", it should be introduced by the preposition "at": At the week END" as we would say "at the end of the week," even in AmE.

  5. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Find the mistake

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    An interesting point about this. AmE is far more conservative than BrE, and we have retained the Teutonic tendency to roll numerous smaller nouns into larger ones -- even more so than BrE.

    This is revealed by intonation. Both "weekend" and "new year" are stressed the same as "bookcase" or "balljoint" in AmE.

    In BrE, the first two are intoned rather more like separate words should be: week END, new YEAR.

    (You will remember that the Anglo-Saxon tradition still alive in English is generally to pronounce multi-syllabic nouns with the stress on the first syllable.)

    Perhaps we should, in AmE, start writing "newyear" as one word, as it is (I believe) in most Germanic languages.

    So, "at the week END" is intoned in BrE rather the same way we would in AmE if we used the much much less frequent, but still plausible, construction: "at the week's end."

    This should explain the difference in usage between at and on: we say, on Saturday, and on Sunday, so if the weekend is uttered as a Teutonic compound noun, fusing the two days into one concept, on the weekend is very natural.

    If, on the other hand, you think of it as "the week END", it should be introduced by the preposition "at": At the week END" as we would say "at the end of the week," even in AmE.
    Awesome writeup. Thanks.

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