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    #1

    He is suited/suitable/fit/fitting for the job

    I shall keep him on if he is suitable for the job, " she said, reclaiming her pride.
    I read the sentence above in the American Corpus and was wondering if we can use all the four adjectives in this sentence 'He is suited/ suitable/ fit/ fitting for the job'. And what are the differences between them?

    Many many thanks in advance.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He is suited/suitable/fit/fitting for the job

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    I shall keep him on if he is suitable for the job, " she said, reclaiming her pride.
    I read the sentence above in the American Corpus and was wondering if we can use all the four adjectives in this sentence 'He is suited/ suitable/ fit/ fitting for the job'. And what are the differences between them?

    Many many thanks in advance.
    I would use only "suitable".

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    #3

    Re: He is suited/suitable/fit/fitting for the job

    I'm still confused about the difference of these words. I found the following sentences from LONGMAN DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN ENGLISH:
    He'd be well suited to the job.
    The job is ideally suited to Amy’scircumstances.

    and from LONGMAN DICTIONARY OF COMMON ERRORS:
    I didn't feel suited (NOT: suitable) to a career in medicine.

    and from Heritage:
    Specialized training fitted her for the job.

    Could anyone be so kind as to give me further explanations for the usage?

    Many thanks in advance.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: He is suited/suitable/fit/fitting for the job

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    I'm still confused about the difference of these words. I found the following sentences from LONGMAN DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN ENGLISH:
    He'd be well suited to the job.
    The job is ideally suited to Amy’scircumstances.

    and from LONGMAN DICTIONARY OF COMMON ERRORS:
    I didn't feel suited (NOT: suitable) to a career in medicine.

    and from Heritage:
    Specialized training fitted her for the job.

    Could anyone be so kind as to give me further explanations for the usage?

    Many thanks in advance.
    We use "suited to", "suitable for".

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