Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,618
    #1

    set up/off a debate

    His suggestion set up/off a heated debate.

    Do both adverbs work for this context?

    Thank you in advance.

  1. riquecohen's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Aug 2010
    • Posts: 6,002
    #2

    Re: set up/off a debate

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    His suggestion set up/off a heated debate.

    Do both adverbs work for this context?

    Thank you in advance.
    Use ''set off" in this context.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,618
    #3

    Re: set up/off a debate

    Thanks, riquecohen.
    Then how about 'The fact that many college graduates get lower salary than some physical labourers has set up/off a heated debate'? Only 'set off' can be used?
    (I read the sentence 'Their negligence set up a chain reaction that resulted in extensive damage' and so got confused about whether we could use 'set up' in a context like this.)
    Thanks again.
    Last edited by joham; 16-Apr-2011 at 23:08.

  2. freezeframe's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 2,113
    #4

    Re: set up/off a debate

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Thanks, riquecohen.
    Then how about 'The fact that many college graduates get lower salary than some physical labourers has set up/off a heated debate'? Only 'set off' can be used? Yes.
    (I read the sentence 'Their negligence set up a chain reaction that resulted in extensive damage' and so got confused about whether we could use 'set up' in a context like this.)
    Thanks again.
    You can replace set off with started or initiated. The fact that college graduates have lower salaries started a debate.

    Set up implies that it didn't just start the debate but created the situation that is the cause for debate.
    In your second sentence the negligence didn't just start the reaction but it created a situation (1) that caused the chain reaction (2).

    If I know that John gets really upset over how he earns less money even though he has a college degree and I decide to introduce him to my plumber friend, Amanda, and then casually mention Amanda's high income, I'm setting up the argument (or debate?).

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,676
    #5

    Re: set up/off a debate

    NOT A TEACHER.

    You could also go for "touch off."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,618
    #6

    Re: set up/off a debate

    Thank you very much, all of you.
    Could you give some other examples of noun phrases as the object of 'set up' which is used to mean 'make happen'?
    I looked it up in several dictionaries, and all have only the collocation of 'set up a chain reaction'.
    Thank you again.

  3. Mr_Ben's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 210
    #7

    Re: set up/off a debate

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Thank you very much, all of you.
    Could you give some examples of noun phrases as the object of 'set up' which is used to mean 'make happen'?
    Thank you again.
    We can set up a meeting with my boss and see if he has any suggestions.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Dec-2009, 10:54
  2. set in, set about, attribute or adverbial
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14-Oct-2008, 16:14
  3. debate
    By chrissum in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2008, 13:33
  4. Debate
    By Noego in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 16-Sep-2007, 13:14
  5. Set foot/set feet
    By zigzag in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Jul-2006, 23:09

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •