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    #1

    at now

    I am asking my friend on mobile.
    Where are you now? or, Can I ask him,
    Where are you at now? Which one is more correct?
    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: at now

    Quote Originally Posted by edmondjanet View Post
    I am asking my friend on mobile.
    Where are you now? or, Can I ask him,
    Where are you at now? Which one is more correct?
    Thank you.
    NOT A TEACHER.

    Only "Where are you now" is correct; however, the other is certainly more common, even among educated speakers, so I would suggest that you use it in all contexts except highly formal ones.

  1. Mr_Ben's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: at now

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    NOT A TEACHER.

    Only "Where are you now" is correct; however, the other is certainly more common, even among educated speakers, so I would suggest that you use it in all contexts except highly formal ones.
    I disagree with this. I personally never use the phrase "Where are you at?" and I don't think anyone I know does either. It is common enough, but more common? Personally, I don't think so.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: at now

    Quote Originally Posted by 可ER忒 View Post


    The "at" is used with "now",not with "where" .
    there is an example:
    But for all of those theories, one needs to understand the water cycle: how much water there was, where it went to, and where it's at now.
    I got it on the internet ,,you'd better to search some .
    Do you have anything useful to say?

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: at now

    I agree with Mr_Ben, "Where are you at?" is completely foreign to me.

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    #6

    Re: at now

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Ben View Post
    I disagree with this. I personally never use the phrase "Where are you at?" and I don't think anyone I know does either. It is common enough, but more common? Personally, I don't think so.
    Among young people it certainly is. "Where are you" sounds incomplete to me, but I realize it's preferred in formal English.

    For arguments for and against "Where are you at," see Where are you (at)? Motivated Grammar.

  4. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: at now

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I agree with Mr_Ben, "Where are you at?" is completely foreign to me.
    The slang expression is "where you at" (without are). This is what the younger crowd says when talking on the cell.

    Not to be used in any kind of "proper" English.

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    #8

    Re: at now

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    NOT A TEACHER.

    Only "Where are you now" is correct; however, the other is certainly more common, even among educated speakers, so I would suggest that you use it in all contexts except highly formal ones.
    Did you perhaps mean, "...is certainly becoming more common...?"

    (Sorry if I'm wrong. I often make this kind of mistakes, so I thought it might have happened.)

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