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    #1

    Rhyme

    Even as an empty eagle, sharp by fast,
    Tires with her beak on feathers, flesh, and bone,
    Shaking her wings, devouring all in haste,
    Till either gorge be stuffed or prey be gone
    Even so she kissed his brow, his cheek, his chin,
    And where she ends she doth anew begin.

    ‘For know, my heart stands armed in mine ear,
    And will not let a false sound enter there, (Do they rhyme because of the pronunciation of the -ar in ear and the -re in there?)
    ...
    Resembling well his pale cheeks and the blood
    Which in round drops upon their whiteness stood.


    We can conclude that in English fast and haste rhyme and so do bone and gone, ear and there, and blood and stood, can't we? (Or are there any changes in pronunciation while we read the poems?)

    Thank you very much in advance.
    Last edited by joham; 20-Apr-2011 at 09:26. Reason: one sentence added.

  1. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Rhyme

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Even as an empty eagle, sharp by fast,
    Tires with her beak on feathers, flesh, and bone,
    Shaking her wings, devouring all in haste,
    Till either gorge be stuffed or prey be gone
    Even so she kissed his brow, his cheek, his chin,
    And where she ends she doth anew begin.

    ‘For know, my heart stands armed in mine ear,
    And will not let a false sound enter there, (Do they rhyme because of the pronunciation of the -ar in ear and the -re in there?)
    ...

    We can conclude that in English fast and haste rhyme and so do bone and gone, and ear and there, can't we? (Or are there any changes in pronunciation while we read the poem?)

    Thank you very much in advance.
    We can conclude that in 1592, they could have rhymed. This was *punching some numbers into the calculator* a long time ago.

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    #3

    Re: Rhyme

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    We can conclude that in 1592, they could have rhymed. This was *punching some numbers into the calculator* a long time ago.
    Thank you very much, freezeframe. Could you please tell me what punching some numbers into the calculator here means?

    And this way of 'rhyme' is still be used by contemporary poets, isn't it?

    Thank you again.
    Last edited by joham; 20-Apr-2011 at 09:37.

  2. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Rhyme

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Thank you very much, freezeframe. Could you please tell me what punching some numbers into the calculator here means?

    And this way of 'rhyme' is still be used by contemporary poets, isn't it?

    Thank you again.
    What way of rhyme? I assume it rhymes because English was pronounced differently over 400 years ago. Today, poets rhyme words according to how they're pronounced today.

    It was a joke about calculating how long ago 1592 was.

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    #5

    Re: Rhyme

    And this way of 'rhyme' is still be used by contemporary poets, isn't it?
    Don't expect contemporary poets to conform to any sort of rhyming convention - if they use rhyme at all.


    They

    call this

    sort

    of thing



    poetry.


    Rover
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 20-Apr-2011 at 19:44.

  3. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Rhyme

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Don't expect contemporary poets to conform to any sort of rhyming convention - if they use rhyme at all.


    They

    call this

    sort

    of thing



    poetry.


    Rover
    Some contemporary poetry rhymes, some doesn't. Free verse is not a recent invention (relatively speaking).

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