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    #1

    making

    I wonder if there is subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. Since your mother is sick, I'm making dinner tonight.
    2. Since your mother is sick, I'll be making dinner tonight.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: making

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. Since your mother is sick, I'm making dinner tonight.
    2. Since your mother is sick, I'll be making dinner tonight.
    No, there is no difference in meaning.

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    #3

    Re: making

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I wonder if there is subtle difference between "1" and "2".
    1. Since your mother is sick, I'm making dinner tonight.
    2. Since your mother is sick, I'll be making dinner tonight.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) The moderator has given all of us an excellent answer. Most

    books tell us that the present and future progressive/continuous

    are, indeed, often interchangeable.

    *****

    (2) Learners who ask questions force me to better understand my

    own English. I always learn so much from trying to answer their

    questions. I have been checking around, and I have found that some

    people feel that there could be a nuance between:

    (a) Mother is sick, so I am cooking dinner tonight.
    (b) Mother is sick, so I will be cooking dinner tonight.

    (3) Mr. M.H., an extremely well-informed person who has given advice at (at least) two helplines, analyzes these sentences:

    (c) We are going to pick up Jon at the airport.
    (d) We are picking up Jon.
    (e) We will be picking up Jon.

    Mr. M.H. says that (d) and (e) are more "lively." I guess he means they show

    more excitement about taking part in the action of picking up Jon.

    And, says Mr. M.H., (e) is the most "anticipatory." That means, I guess,

    that (e) shows the most excitement and eagerness (happiness) about

    picking up Jon.

    (4) Ms./Mr. P is not a native speaker. That means nothing. Many

    non-native speakers understand English grammar much better than I.

    S/he feels that the present progressive = a future that is arranged. That is, it's a "sure thing."

    The future progressive, s/he feels, = less stress on the fact that

    something has been arranged. To quote him/her: "It's as if you were

    seeing yourself doing something."

    (5) And Ms. A., an extremely well-qualified teacher of international

    students, reminds us of something that all the great teachers at

    usingenglish.com are always reminding us learners: CONTEXT. That is,

    how were those sentences said, where were they said, and when were

    they said?

    (a) According to Ms. A., a sentence like (a) could be used in different

    contexts. I shall give only one. "Mother is sick, so I am cooking dinner

    tonight" could mean that the speaker usually does not cook dinner.

    (b) On the other hand, "Mother is sick, so I will be cooking dinner

    tonight" could mean (depending on the context) that the speaker

    quite often does it. (MY NOTE: Let's say that Mother has a serious

    illness. She usually cooks dinner, but it's the family plan that on those

    days when she is too ill, the speaker regularly takes over.)

    (6) Hopefully, other people will add their input. That is how all of

    us learn more. When it comes to language, we should all be very

    humble.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: making

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post

    (a) Mother is sick, so I am cooking dinner tonight.
    (b) Mother is sick, so I will be cooking dinner tonight.

    According to Ms. A., a sentence like (a) could be used in different contexts. I shall give only one. "Mother is sick, so I am cooking dinner tonight" could mean that the speaker usually does not cook dinner. (b) On the other hand, "Mother is sick, so I will be cooking dinner tonight" could mean (depending on the context) that the speaker quite often does it.
    I like that interpretation. A lot.

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    #5

    Re: making

    Not a native speaker.

    I suppose that in the right context #1 could also be heard in a conversation taken place at night, while #2 couldn't be so used.

    Tom returned home. It was eight o'clock. He saw Steve, his father, was busy in the kitchen.

    Tom:Why are you cooking?

    Steve:Since your mother is sick, I'm making dinner tonight.

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