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    #1

    to be an angel

    How to combine the two sentences into one? Is #3 acceptable?

    (1) In the speech, he encouraged young students to be an angel in your own life.
    (2) In the speech, he encouraed young students to be an angel in other people's life.

    (3) In the speech, he encouraged young students to be an angel in your own life and other people's life.

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    #2

    Re: to be an angel

    (3) In the speech, he encouraged young students to be an angel of your own life and other people's lives.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to be an angel

    To my ear, the expression 'be an angel' doesn't work. It's a common collocation in Br Eng when asking a favour: - 'Be an angel and pass those biscuits'.

    In the OP's context I would use something else, like 'become an angel'.

    b

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    #4

    Re: to be an angel

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashiuhto View Post
    How to combine the two sentences into one? Is #3 acceptable?

    (1) In the speech, he encouraged young students to be an angel in your own life.
    (2) In the speech, he encouraed young students to be an angel in other people's life.

    (3) In the speech, he encouraged young students to be an angel in your own life and other people's life.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    (1) As the moderator said, "Be an angel" is often used to ask for

    a favor. It is also used here in the United States.

    (2) I think that people who use it feel that it will get better

    results than a simple "please."

    (a) Would you please run down to the cafeteria and get me a cup of

    coffee? And on the way back, would you photocopy this 100-page

    report?

    (b) By appealing to your angelic instincts, you might be more

    willing to do the favor:

    Darling, be an angel and get me a cup of coffee in the caf, won't you?

    And could you photocopy this 100-page report on the way back? You're

    a real angel! (And who doesn't like to be called an angel?)

    P.S. If you are a man, it might be wiser to avoid this

    expression -- at least here in the United States and in certain

    social circles.

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