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  1. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #1

    The meanings of the fancy

    Hello.
    I'm trying to start using that word and would like to hear some advice from you.

    1. Can I use 'I'm just fancy (I'd like to know) if he is a friend of yours.' ?
    Should I put the question mark at the end of this sentece?

    2. If you fancy sb, does that mean that you are sexually attracted to sb or you might just be attracted? I can't think of the meaning of this word in the sentence 'I fancy celebrities rather like the Olympians of old'. I begin to think that the sentence is sarcastic.

    Thanks,
    Alex.
    Last edited by AlexAD; 25-Apr-2011 at 21:29.

  2. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Hello.
    I'm trying to start use that word and would like to hear some advices from you.

    1. Can I use 'I'm just fancy (I'd like to know) if he is a friend of yours.' ?
    Should I put the question mark at the end of this sentece?

    2. If you fancy sb, does that mean that you are sexually attracted to sb or you might just be attracted? I can't think of the meaning of this word in a sentence, 'I fancy celebrities rather like the Olympians of old'. I begin to think that the sentence is sarcastic.

    Thanks,
    Alex.
    Advice is uncountable.

    You could say "I fancy he's a friend of yours". But that would sound a little weird here. I would say "I imagine he's a friend of yours".

    Yes, if you "fancy somebody" you're sexually/romantically attracted to them. But that usage sounds outdated to me and I would ever use it only jokingly/sarcastically.
    You can also "fancy something" if you want it. "I fancy a hard boiled egg for breakfast".
    I fancy that British people use fancy like this. At least, I hear it in their shows and not in American ones.

    I would ever use fancy only as an adjective.

  3. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    Thank you for the detailed reply, especially that you drew my attention to the advice, but there are still some questions about it.

    1. Well, how else can I express that "I'm wondering if he's friends of yours"
    (Attention, a question here: I deliberately leave out a question mark here but grammatically that's still a question. Am I supposed to do that?)

    2. If fancy means sexually attracted I can't think of how one could being fancied by the Olympians of old.
    You might look at the example given above.

    Thank you,
    Alex.
    Last edited by AlexAD; 25-Apr-2011 at 21:32.

  4. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    Here we go again.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Here we go again.
    If that is a sign of your impatience, it is not going to do much to attract people to give up their limited free time to help you.
    1. Well, how else can I express that "I'm wondering if he's a friends of yours" ?
    (Attention, a question here: I deliberately leave out a question mark here but grammatically that's still a question. Am I supposed to do that?)
    It's a direct question - the question mark is necessary.

    As freezeframe said, it's possible to say
    "I fancy he's a friend of yours" or "I imagine he's a friend of yours" though "I'm wondering..." is more questioning. You could simply pose the question: "Is he a friend of yours".

    2. If fancy means sexually attracted I can't think of how one could being fancied by the Olympians of old.
    'I fancy celebrities rather like the Olympians of old'.

    Without more context, it is difficult to say exactly what the writer means. It could be, "I imagine/picture celebrities as being similar to the Olympians of old".

  6. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    Here we go again.
    To be honest I just wanted to put the thread at the top. I didn't mean any impatience at all, though you might think I did. How else can I express something like "Hey, see, I'm at the top again"?
    The fact is that the question list is going up extremly fast, so had I not thrown it at the top I probably wouldn't have any answer at all.
    I hope you will understand me.

    Thanks,
    Alex

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    To be honest I just wanted to put the thread at the top.
    Sorry I misunderstood you.

  8. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexAD View Post
    To be honest I just wanted to put the thread at the top. I didn't mean any impatience at all, though you might think I did. How else can I express something like "Hey, see, I'm at the top again"?
    The fact is that the question list is going up extremly fast, so had I not thrown it at the top I probably wouldn't have any answer at all.
    I hope you will understand me.

    Thanks,
    Alex
    "Here we go again" can be interpreted as "No one is answering as usual". This comes across as rude.

    Usually if you want to move your thread to the top, you can post "bump" in your thread because you're bumping it up.

    In some forums bumping your thread is against forum rules though and/or is bannable if used too often. I'm not sure about this one.

  9. AlexAD's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    Well, that should've been written like Here I come again.

  10. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: The meanings of the fancy

    The Olympians were always running around having children with mortals. I hope they fancied them at least a little before creating the child and returning to Olympus.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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