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    #1

    Although?

    Hello,

    Could you help me with this sentence?:

    I was quite annoyed with Kate, ............ I decided not to say anything.

    We have to choose among these words:

    In spite of, moreover, although, however, in addition, furthermore, what's more, despite.

    My choice would be "although". What do you think? Is there any other word that would suit well here?

    Thank you.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Although?

    Quote Originally Posted by ratóncolorao View Post
    I was quite annoyed with Kate, ............ I decided not to say anything. [...]

    My choice would be "although". What do you think?
    You made the right choice. You could also use 'but' and, if you changed the comma to a semi-colon, 'however'.

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    #3

    Re: Although?

    You can really put 'although' there? *sighs*

    I'd rather say:
    Although I was quite annoyed with Kate, I decided not to say anything.

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    #4

    Re: Although?

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    You can really put 'although' there? *sighs*

    I'd rather say:
    Although I was quite annoyed with Kate, I decided not to say anything.

    Yes, what you say seems to have sense. Anyway, it is an example taken from a grammar book. Sometimes those examples drive me crazy. I don't know who writes them......I don't care if they are native English or not.

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    #5

    Re: Although?

    Quote Originally Posted by ratóncolorao View Post
    Yes, what you say seems to have sense. Anyway, it is an example taken from a grammar book. Sometimes those examples drive me crazy. I don't know who writes them......I don't care if they are native English or not.
    Okay, I read it a couple of times, moved 'although' around (e.g. Although I decided not to say anything, I was quite annoyed with Kate) and 'decided' it's fine. ;)

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    #6

    Re: Although?

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    You can really put 'although' there? *sighs*

    I'd rather say:
    Although I was quite annoyed with Kate, I decided not to say anything.
    Unfortunately for us learners, native English speakers have decided that they want to use "although" ambiguously. I understand that you're confused by what you have been taught (as I once was) that we should always use "although" and "but" according to the following pattern:

    Although I sit, I work. = I sit, but I work.

    with "although" and "but" sticking to their prescribed clauses. The usage is not so simple. "Although" can often replace "but".

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    #7

    Re: Although?

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Unfortunately for us learners, native English speakers have decided that they want to use "although" ambiguously. I understand that you're confused by what you have been taught (as I once was) that we should always use "although" and "but" according to the following pattern:

    Although I sit, I work. = I sit, but I work.

    with "although" and "but" sticking to their according clauses. The usage is not so simple. "Although" can often replace "but".

    I don't even remember what I was taught, but it must've been that because "although" wasn't my immediate choice there.

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    #8

    Re: Although?

    Quote Originally Posted by ratóncolorao View Post
    Yes, what you say seems to have sense.
    In English, things make sense. They don't have sense.

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    #9

    Re: Although?

    Quote Originally Posted by nyota View Post
    You can really put 'although' there? *sighs*

    I'd rather say:
    Although I was quite annoyed with Kate, I decided not to say anything.
    That is the more normal position, but in some sentences it is possible to make either clause the main one. It would not be possible in this one:

    Although it was raining, I went to the swimming pool.
    It was raining, although I went to the swimming pool.

    Compare:
    1. I was annoyed with K, but I decided not to say anything.
    (The annoyance preceded the decision)
    2. I decided not to say anything, but I was annoyed with K. (Unusual, but possible. It is clear that the annoyance must have preceded the decision)

    3. It was raining, but I went to the pool. ( the natural interpretation is that it was raining when/before I set out for the pool.
    4. I went to the pool, but it was raining
    . (The only natural interpretation is that it was raining after I had set out for the pool.)

    It's a question of the timing of the situations and of cause and effect.

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    #10

    Re: Although?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    In English, things make sense. They don't have sense.
    Yes, you are right. Thank you.

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