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    #1

    ain't no

    HI , some times I have heard people saying sentences like

    1. I ain't no good with children .
    2. He ain't no Tommy ( a name )

    don't understand why they use ain't and no together however ain't itself means "are not/ is not/ am not" etc. Can any one comment please ?

  1. SirGod's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: ain't no

    *Not a teacher

    I have come across these quite often, especially in movies. They are widely used in the colloquial language. Personally, I would (and I did) use ain't only in oral conversations.

  2. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: ain't no

    It's dialect but also used sometimes for rhetorical effect. As noted above, it's colloquial.

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    #4

    Re: ain't no

    Quote Originally Posted by vivek957 View Post
    HI , some times I have heard people saying sentences like

    1. I ain't no good with children .
    2. He ain't no Tommy ( a name )

    don't understand why they use ain't and no together however ain't itself means "are not/ is not/ am not" etc. Can any one comment please ?

    ***** A NON-TEACHER's OPINION *****


    (1) In modern English, two negatives are considered "bad" English.

    For example, some people say: "I don't have no money"

    instead of "I don't have any money."

    (2) Most people here in the United States do not use the word

    "ain't." Most people feel that it shows a lack of education. Sometimes

    people use it because they want to be humorous:

    Tom: That girl is ugly.

    Joe: Ain't that the truth!!!


    (3) In my opinion, anyone who used "ain't" regularly would never

    be elected to high political office. Probably most people would

    lose respect for him/her.

    (4) Of course, you hear "ain't" a lot in popular music, but that is

    OK because it is music. We do not expect "perfect" grammar from

    singers.

    (5) By the way, "He ain't no XX" is a way of saying that

    someone does not equal another person. For example, some

    people might say: President X is a good president but he

    ain't no George Washington. (George Washington was considered

    one of our best presidents. So the speaker is saying that President

    X is not so good as George Washington.)

    (6) You are a learner. It would probably be a good idea to never

    use this word. After you really know English, then you might use it

    occasionally in order to be humorous.


    Respectfully yours,


    James

  3. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: ain't no

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post

    (3) In my opinion, anyone who used "ain't" regularly would never

    be elected to high political office. Probably most people would

    lose respect for him/her.
    Yes, everyone elected to high political office is an orator to rival Cicero...

    But, to be serious...

    Most people here in the United States do not use the word
    "ain't." Most people feel that it shows a lack of education.
    While I agree that "ain't" isn't "standard English" (whatever this means), it is normative in some dialects, prejudice notwithstanding. I don't know what kind of statistics you have in mind when you say "most". "Ain't" is, for example, used in African American Vernacular. And it is used conversationally for rhetorical effect by speakers of all classes/education levels. There's nothing inherently "wrong" with it; one just must be aware of context. Most people speak in different registers that they switch among based on situation.

    I leave you with this (skip to 1:25)

    YouTube - ITN: Ronald Reagan Victorious in Presidential Election (1984)


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    #6

    Re: ain't no

    Lots of people will use the double negative in speech. Meaning is usually perfectly clear.

    I agree learners should avoid the construction and the use of "ain't."

    But "You haven't seen anything yet" does not have the same impact as "You ain't seen nothing yet."

  4. SanMar's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: ain't no

    In my opinion..

    I wouldn't suggest using aint in a professional or academic situation.
    So it aint a good idea on an essay or job interview!
    Amongst friends or informally it may be acceptable, depends where I guess.

    Not a teacher.

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