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    #1

    For or To

    Can anyone please tell me if these sentences are both correct or not?

    I went to the town centre to buy shoes.
    I went to the town centre for buying shoes.

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: For or To

    Not a teacher.
    Only the first one is natural.

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    #3

    Re: For or To

    Can you tell me how I know when to use "for" and when to use "to"

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    #4

    Re: For or To

    Quote Originally Posted by crazyaboutenglish View Post
    Can you tell me how I know when to use "for" and when to use "to"

    ***** A NON-TEACHER's COMMENT *****


    (1) I found the answer in the 1995 edition of Mr. Michael Swan's

    Practical English Usage (Item #213, not page 213):

    Mr. Swan says:

    For can be used to talk about somebody's purpose, but

    ONLY when it is followed by a NOUN.

    (a) So I guess that your sentence could be:

    I went downtown for some shoes. ("shoes" = noun)

    Then the esteemed scholar tells us:

    For is NOT used before a verb in this sense. Only the INFINITIVE

    expresses a person's purpose.

    (b) So I guess your sentence could be:

    I went downtown to buy some shoes. ("to buy" = infinitive)

    (2) Mr. Swan then gives us two wonderful examples to study:

    We stopped at the pub [bar] to have a drink. [NOT: for having a drink.]

    I went to the college to see Professor Taylor. [NOT: for seeing ....]

    (3) These are only my examples:

    We stopped at the pub for a drink. ("a drink" = noun)

    I went to the college for a meeting with Professor Taylor. ("meeting"

    = noun)


    Respectfully yours,


    James

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    #5

    Re: For or To

    Thanks a lot these help me

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