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    #1

    "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."

    Verb patterns with that-clauses « English Practice – Learn and Practice English Online
    He admitted that he had stolen the watch.

    Woman jailed for knifepoint robbery - Metropolitan Police Service
    The turning point came when she owned up to the fact that it was her on the CCTV.

    Do you use "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..." in the same sense?

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    #2

    Re: "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."

    Yes, we do.

    You'll have noticed that the former is a much shorter way of saying the same thing.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by sunsunmoon View Post
    Verb patterns with that-clauses « English Practice – Learn and Practice English Online
    He admitted that he had stolen the watch.

    Woman jailed for knifepoint robbery - Metropolitan Police Service
    The turning point came when she owned up to the fact that it was her on the CCTV.

    Do you use "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..." in the same sense?

    NOT A TEACHER

    Since you are a learner who wishes to speak "perfect" English,

    you may want to know that a few people still say that the

    "correct" pronoun is "she":

    It was she on CCTV.

    Tom: Who's at the door?

    Martha: It's I.

    Most native speakers, however, seem to accept the object forms

    nowadays: It's me.

    Nevertheless, if you are doing university-level writing, I hope that

    you will use the nominative (subject) forms:

    It was he, she, we, they.


    The above is only my opinion.

  1. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    Since you are a learner who wishes to speak "perfect" English,

    you may want to know that a few people still say that the

    "correct" pronoun is "she":

    It was she on CCTV.

    Tom: Who's at the door?

    Martha: It's I.

    Most native speakers, however, seem to accept the object forms

    nowadays: It's me.

    Nevertheless, if you are doing university-level writing, I hope that

    you will use the nominative (subject) forms:

    It was he, she, we, they.


    The above is only my opinion.
    1. There is no such thing as perfect English.

    2. I do university-level writing and have been doing that for many many years and I use the forms that you find to be wrong. Nobody has ever said anything about that yet. Fingers crossed.

    3. From Oxford Dictionaries:
    her

    used after the verb ‘to be’ and after ‘than’ or ‘as’:
    it must be her
    he was younger than her

    See her (usage) below
    Usage

    Is it incorrect to sayI am older than her (rather than I am older than she) or it‘s her all right (rather than it’s she all right) and, if so, why? For a discussion of this issue, see personal pronoun (usage)
    Where a personal pronoun is used alone without the context of a verb or a preposition, however , the traditional analysis starts to break down . Traditionalists sometimes argue, for example, that she‘s younger than me and I’ve not been here as long as her are incorrect and that the correct forms are she‘s younger than I and I’ve not been here as long as she. This is based on the assumption that than and as are conjunctions and so the personal pronoun is still subjective even though there is no verb (in full form it would be she‘s younger than I am). Yet for most native speakers the supposed’ correct ‘form does not sound natural at all and is almost never used in speech. It would perhaps be more accurate to say that, in modern English, those personal pronouns listed above as being objective are used neutrally — i.e. they are used in all cases where the pronoun is not explicitly subjective. From this it follows that, despite the objections of prescriptive grammarians (whose arguments are based on Latin rather than English), it is standard accepted English to use any of the following: Who is it? It’s me!; she‘s taller than him; I didn’t do as well as her.
    definition of personal pronoun from Oxford Dictionaries Online

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    #5

    Re: "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."

    Any comments on "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that...," freezeframe?

  2. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by sunsunmoon View Post
    Any comments on "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that...," freezeframe?
    What was wrong with Rover's answer?

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    #7

    Re: "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."

    freezeframe,
    I'd like to hear your opinion.

  3. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by sunsunmoon View Post
    freezeframe,
    I'd like to hear your opinion.

    Why? If I had an opinion or wanted to offer one, I would have posted it.

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    #9

    Re: "admit that..." and "own up to the fact that..."


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