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    #1

    sit up front

    Dear all,

    What is the meaning of "sit up front" in:

    [YOU DON'T GET QUITE THE SCENIC VIEW. I MEAN, YOU
    GOT TO SIT UP FRONT. I FEEL LIKE A CAGED ANIMAL]

    I googled it. It's all about children

    that was said by a woman in a road trip with her
    husbands and 2 of their friends.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: sit up front

    Does it like "let's face it" or something?

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    #3

    Re: sit up front

    . . .to sit in the front passenger seat.

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: sit up front

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    . . .to sit in the front passenger seat.

    Rover
    I thought so, but she said "You got to".I assumed she was talking to somebody. (nobody in the front but the driver (her husband) and his friend. or she said "you" meaning "we"?

  1. freezeframe's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: sit up front

    Quote Originally Posted by maiabulela View Post
    I thought so, but she said "You got to".I assumed she was talking to somebody. (nobody in the front but the driver (her husband) and his friend. or she said "you" meaning "we"?
    I don't understand this question.

    8. [intransitive/transitive] [never passive]
    to have the opportunity or be able to do something

    get to do something:

    Did you get to visit the Vietnam Memorial when you were in Washington?



    Her brothers went out a lot, but Lisa never got to go.


    get - definition. American English definition of get by Macmillan Dictionary

  2. riquecohen's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: sit up front

    Quote Originally Posted by maiabulela View Post
    I thought so, but she said "You got to".I assumed she was talking to somebody. (nobody in the front but the driver (her husband) and his friend. or she said "you" meaning "we"?
    "You" can be used as a substitute for "one," "anyone" or "a person." She was sitting in the back seat, not getting the complete view and feeling like a caged animal. Her complaint to others in the car could be read as follows: "One doesn't get quite the scenic view. A person has to sit up front" (in order to get the scenic view.)

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: sit up front

    I didn't read it as "one must sit up front to see the view." I read it as "You were given the privilege of sitting up front."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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