Results 1 to 10 of 10
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #1

    get after or get on

    "My mom's been getting after me about cleaning up my room."

    OR

    "My mom's been getting on me to clean up my room."

    I guess the second sentence would be as if my mom's critisizing me, whereas the first one would convey more general meaning like "talling me"?
    Last edited by ostap77; 12-May-2011 at 21:06.

  1. freezeframe's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 2,113
    #2

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "My mom's been getting after me about cleaning up my room."

    OR

    "My mom's been getting on me to clean up my room."

    I guess the second sentence would be as if my mom's critisizing me, whereas the first one would convey more general meaning like "telling me"?
    You can tell someone to "get off me" but I don't think "getting on me" is idiomatic (perhaps someone has a different opinion). You definitely cannot use "after" there.

    You can say "(getting) on my case" or "(getting) on my back".

    You can also say "on me" but without getting.

    These are all colloquial.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #3

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    You can tell someone to "get off me" but I don't think "getting on me" is idiomatic (perhaps someone has a different opinion). You definitely cannot use "after" there.

    You can say "(getting) on my case" or "(getting) on my back".

    You can also say "on me" but without getting.

    These are all colloquial.
    In BrE you can say "my mum"s been getting on at me".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #4

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    You can tell someone to "get off me" but I don't think "getting on me" is idiomatic (perhaps someone has a different opinion). You definitely cannot use "after" there.

    You can say "(getting) on my case" or "(getting) on my back".

    You can also say "on me" but without getting.

    These are all colloquial.
    I'm affraid by saying "your definitely cannot use "after" there." you would be giving not quite accurate answer.

    Either I understood it in a wrong way or the dictionary I use has been "fixed" on purpose.

    "get after (someone) US, informal : to tell (someone) repeatedly to do something
    ▪ His parents are always getting after him about doing his homework. = His parents are always getting after him to do his homework."

  3. freezeframe's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 2,113
    #5

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    I'm affraid by saying "your definitely cannot use "after" there." would be giving not quite accurate answer.

    Either I understood it in a wrong way or the dictionary I use has been "fixed" on purpose.

    "get after (someone) US, informal : to tell (someone) repeatedly to do something
    ▪ His parents are always getting after him about doing his homework. = His parents are always getting after him to do his homework."

    Okay. Does your dictionary say where it's used and what demographic uses it? Because I'm afraid that my demographic doesn't use after there.

    I'm giving you accurate answers for colloquial terms as they're used where I live by people around me. I cannot give you accurate answers for how people of other demographics in other parts of the world talk. I think that is understood.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #6

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    Okay. Does your dictionary say where it's used and what demographic uses it? Because I'm afraid that my demographic doesn't use after there.

    I'm giving you accurate answers for colloquial terms as they're used where I live by people around me. I cannot give you accurate answers for how people of other demographics in other parts of the world talk. I think that is understood.
    Hope no hard feelings taken. Do you think an on-line dictionary would be a trust-worthy source?

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary

  4. freezeframe's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 2,113
    #7

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Hope no hard feelings taken. Do you think an on-line dictionary would be a trust-worthy source?

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    It is a trustworthy source, as long as it's a reputable dictionary and it's their official site.

    My point was more general:

    Dictionaries will not tell you the frequency of usage or where/who uses that word. They just defines it. So, there might be people who use it often, and there might be people to whom it sounds strange.

    Sometimes it will indicate that the word is a regionalism or that the word is obsolete.

    No hard feelings of course. It's just that I've been told I give inaccurate information before and I got too sensitive. I'm not here trying to teach people wrong English: YouTube - Monty Python - Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #8

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    It is a trustworthy source, as long as it's a reputable dictionary and it's their official site.

    My point was more general:

    Dictionaries will not tell you the frequency of usage or where/who uses that word. They just defines it. So, there might be people who use it often, and there might be people to whom it sounds strange.

    Sometimes it will indicate that the word is a regionalism or that the word is obsolete.

    No hard feelings of course. It's just that I've been told I give inaccurate information before and I got too sensitive. I'm not here trying to teach people wrong English: YouTube - Monty Python - Dirty Hungarian Phrasebook
    Don't get me wrong. Would these on-line dictionaries be not reliable source of information?

  5. freezeframe's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2011
    • Posts: 2,113
    #9

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    Don't get me wrong. Would these on-line dictionaries be not reliable source of information?
    I already said yes.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #10

    Re: get after or get on

    Quote Originally Posted by freezeframe View Post
    I already said yes.
    So you would be saying like it's reliable or unreliable source of inforamtion?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •